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Summits & Symposia

Friday, August 3, 2018

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions

2.0 CEUs | Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM

Track: Therapy

Panelists

  • Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D., Founder of the Society for Existential Analysis and Existential Analysis and Principal of the New School of Psychotherapy and Counselling
  • Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D., Eminent Professor of Psychology at the University of Memphis and Editor of Death Studies
  • Bruce Alexander, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Simon Fraser University and researcher in global drug addiction
  • Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor at the European University in Frankfurt and Senior Research Associate at Rhodes University
  • Julia Yang, Ph.D., Professor at the National Kaohsiung Normal University
  • Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc., Programme Leader of MSc Coaching Psychology and Personal Coach
  • Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D., Founder of Meaning Therapy and the International Network on Personal Meaning, and Professor Emeritus of Trent University

Moderator | Joel Vos, Ph.D., Clinical and Health Psychologist and Philosopher and Director of Meaning Online

Summit Abstract

A summary of the last summit on meaning therapy can be found in an article on five different perspectives of meaning in clinical practice. It is hoped that this year’s summit will lead to a landmark publication on what constitutes existential competency in clinical practice that is both trans-diagnostic and relevant to any therapeutic modality.

This summit will address broad existential issues such as: (1) What is an existential crisis? How can it be an opportunity for healing and personal growth? (2) Why is exploring one’s dark side needed to live life at a deeper spiritual level? (3) Are there different kinds of meaning-seeking with different implications for therapy? (4) What are some types of evidence-based meaning-focused coping? (5) What is ultimate meaning? How is it related to meaning-seeking and meaning-making? (6) How does the process of cultivating inner resources and intrinsic motivation increase one’s sense of meaning? (7) Is it necessary to teach clients to focus both on coping with the present reality and striving towards a future dream? (8) Is it helpful to teach clients to navigate between yin-yang and find the right balance between avoidance and approach? (9) Is the knowledge and skill of cultivating the spiritual values of sacredness and transcendental reality an essential part of existential competency? (10) How can we relate to our clients both as fellow human beings as well as competent and trustworthy mental health professionals?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the breadth and depth of existential competency
  2. Understand the importance of values and beliefs in meaning-seeking and meaning-making
  3. Learn how to relate to clients both as a professional and as a caring human being
  4. Learn how to integrate existential psychology and positive psychology in psychotherapy or coaching

Length: 2 hours

Emmy van Deurzen

An existential crisis is generated when circumstances present us with a situation where our safety is compromised in such a comprehensive way that we lose our sense of identity. It is important for us to understand how we can create a network of meaning that protects us from such an eventuality.  This involves exploring the dark side of life, even before bad things happen to us and to understand something about the paradoxical nature of human existence.

Robert Neimeyer | Reconstructing Meaning in Loss: A Constructivist Perspective

From a narrative constructivist perspective, profound loss rends the fabric of our life story, unraveling the strands of meaning and purpose that confer meaning on our lives. Meeting clients at this abyss, therapists listen between the lines of the story clients tell themselves and others about what they suffer, to discern their implicit needs and readiness to address them. Drawing on their own empathic and embodied resonance to the client’s suffering, therapists help clients access and articulate the passionate and preverbal meanings of their loss, and seek to review, revise, or replace those core constructs that have been challenged by their existential transition using any of a variety of experientially vivid and increasingly evidence-informed methods. Significantly, the resulting process of reconstruction is as social as it is personal, and commonly involves not only addressing the traumatic disruption of mourners’ world assumptions occasioned by the “event story” of the loss, but also restoring and re-storying the “back story” of their relation to the deceased.

Bruce Alexander | What Shakespeare Knew About the Meaning of Addiction, But We Have Forgotten

Shakespeare and his contemporaries used the word “addiction” both to describe deplorable compulsions to drunkenness and to describe admirable devotions to religion, scholarship, a beloved person, or companionable drinking with worthy friends. In its second sense, “addiction” was considered an achievement that gave life richness and meaning (Lemon, 2018). The second sense of “addiction” has been forgotten in its almost entirely pejorative 21st century usage. Should addiction professionals learn more about Shakespeare’s insights, and understand our clients’ destructive addictions largely as attempts to impart meaning to spiritually impoverished lives?  Treatment would then seek less destructive sources of meaning.

Claude-Hélène Mayer | From Cultural Reflexivity to Transcultural Meaning-Making in Therapy

During the past years, research has highlighted that cultural reflexivity is a core competence in therapy and in the use of therapeutic interventions, particularly when it comes to meaning-making. Therapists are advised to reflect on their cultural biases to increase empathy across cultural divides and to apply adequate interventions. In this talk it is argued that therapists do not only need to be cultural reflective, but also need to develop a transcultural competence to expand and even transform culture-specific towards transcultural meaning-making in therapy. Transcultural meaning-making can add value to the therapy. Examples from two culture-specific therapeutic contexts are provided.

Julia Yang | The Courage of Living, Acting and Dying: Meaning-Centered Intervention with Community Feeling

For Individual Psychology (IP), the quest of meaning is only meaningful in the organic context of wholeness and purpose of human nature. IP regards all human striving as a struggle for perfection, a movement that leads from a minus to a plus situation. In one’s active adaptation to the demands of living, acting and ultimately dying, the healthy individual exercises an existential choice of transcending self-preservation and striving toward belonging and significance.  Meaning intervention in IP thus pertains to evoking courage that guides the dialectic change process of relational mutuality, life style investigation, attainment of insight and a reorientation toward community feeling.

Yannick Jacob | How Can We Prepare Ourselves for the Big Meaning Crisis of the 21st Century?

As human beings it is inevitable to at some point sooner or later find ourselves in what existentialists call a boundary situation: coming face to face with the inevitable paradoxes and dilemmas of the human condition. I believe one of the most pertinent threats to our piece of mind in the not-too distant future will be the challenge to make meaning in a world where a vast amount of jobs – arguably one of the most prevalent sources of meaning in a person’s life – will be replaced by artificial intelligence. I believe that we can help people foster existential resilience by creating a safe space for clients to prepare themselves by considering the challenging questions before the emerging meaning crisis.

Symposium on Clinical Supervision: Coping with Harmful Supervision, Supervisee’s Crises, and Difficult Situations During Psychotherapy Sessions

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM

Track: Therapy

Panelists

  • Ishu Ishiyama, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, University of British Columbia
  • Sandra Yuk Shuen Wong, Ph.D., Registered Psychologist, Dr. Wong & Associates, Professional Psychology Corp.
  • Milly Yin Mei Ng, M.A., Ph.D. Cand., Simon Fraser University
  • Mega Leung, M.A., R.C.C., C.T.T.S., Registered Clinical Counsellor, Certified Trauma Treatment Specialist

Moderator | Lilian C. J. Wong, Ph.D., R.P., Vice President, Meaning-Centered Counselling Institute, Inc.

Symposium Abstract

Most psychotherapists and counsellors have experienced harmful supervision (Ellis et al., 2014) and encountered difficult situations in their clinical practice, especially during their early career years. Harmful supervision includes abuse of power, personality conflict, cultural or theoretical biases, etc. Difficult counselling situations include challenging clients (Clay, 2017), competency deficits (Schroder & Davis, 2006), and crisis intervention (e.g., suicide). Fortunately, harmful supervision can provide opportunities for personal and professional growth (Wong et al., 2013; William-Nickelson, 2004). Similarly, crises and negative experiences in clinical practice also provide opportunities for self-reflection, gaining deeper self-understanding, and professional growth. In this symposium, cultural diversity in supervision will also be addressed.

References

  1. Clay, R. A. (2017). Coping with challenging clients. Monitor on Psychology, 48(7), 55. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/monitor/2017/07-08/challenging-clients.aspx
  2. Ellis, M. V., Berger, L., Hanus, A. E., Ayala, E. E., Swords, B. A., & Siembor, M. (2014). Inadequate and harmful clinical supervision: Testing a revised framework and assessing occurrence. The Counseling Psychologist42(4), 434-472. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000013508656
  3. Schröder, T. A., & Davis, J. D. (2004). Therapists’ experience of difficulty in practice. Psychotherapy Research14(3), 328-345. https://doi.org/10.1093/ptr/kph028
  4. Williams-Nickelson, C. (2004). When bad supervision is good. gradPSYCH Magazine, 2(1). Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/gradpsych/2004/01/matters.aspx
  5. Wong, L. C., Wong, P. T., & Ishiyama, F. I. (2013). What helps and what hinders in cross-cultural clinical supervision: A critical incident study. The Counseling Psychologist41(1), 66-85. https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000012442652
Symposium on Meaning-Centered Organizational Development Practices

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Track: Coaching

Panelists

  • Eileen Dowse, Ph.D., Organizational Psychologist, President of Human Dynamics, and award-winning author of The Naked Manager: How to Build Open Relationships at Work
  • Jim Rough, M.B.A., M.S.E.E., Director and Founder of the Center for Wise Democracy and author of Society’s Breakthrough! Releasing Essential Wisdom and Virtue in all People
  • Luis A. Marrero, M.A., symposium chair and facilitator, CEO, Boston Institute for Meaningful Purpose, author of The Path to a Meaningful Purpose: Psychological Foundations of Logoteleology and pioneer of Second Wave Organization Development (OD 2.0)
  • Shizuka Modica, Ph.D., Professor of Organizational Behavior and Leadership, Kyoto College of Graduate Studies for Informatics; Adjunct Faculty, Darden School of Business, University of Virginia

Moderator | Luis A. Marrero, M.A.

Symposium Abstract

Key macro-indicators pertaining to employee engagement (Gallup), trust in leadership (Edelman), and happiness at work (Dr. Barry Schwartz; United Nations Happiness Report) remain stubbornly in negative terrain. There is a growing recognition in the field of organizational development (OD) that current practices are not having the desired effect of releasing human potential within organizations—be it in business, nonprofit volunteer organizations, or governments. Given this situation, a big shift toward meaningful work is taking place. It can be said that the field of organization development is returning to its social justice roots, promoted by the founder of OD, Kurt Lewin, also the pioneer of Social Psychology. Yet, this promising shift will not be enough to bring about lasting change unless archaic systemic forces and the assumptions that sustain them are confronted and replaced with more science-based alternatives.

This symposium explores the various ways in which OD researchers and practitioners utilize emerging constructs of meaning and purpose to organize and motivate employee engagement, performance, and fulfillment. Some of the key themes and questions being considered include:

  • Are there systemic forces stymieing societies and their organizations from solving fundamental problems? And if so, what solutions can best tackle the gridlock?
  • How can organizations monitor meaningfulness and productivity measures?
  • What challenges may organizations face in using meaning-centered models?
  • How best to promote meaning-centered approaches to organizational leaders?

Panel participant will share some of the most significant challenges facing organizational leaders and change agents today and offer promising solutions to improve engagement through meaning-centered methods.

Eileen Dowse | Creating Collaborative Impact

Collaboration is said to take place when two individuals or a group of people work together towards achieving a common goal by sharing their ideas and skills. One of the biggest factors contributing to the success of any organization is whether or not its employees are able to perform together as a team, since working as a high-performing team enables employees to be more accountable, effective, and collaborative in their work. This presentation focuses on leadership competencies recommended for establishing supportive environments, generating valuable dialogue, and building rapport with stakeholders. It will assist you in the areas of leading and thinking through ambiguity and complexity.

Learning Objectives

This presentation focuses on creating strategies for success by helping leaders collaborate more effectively and leverage existing strengths. In addition, you will be exposed to techniques for:

  1. Leveraging the knowledge and wisdom of your organization’s human capital.
  2. Effectively engaging staff and building ownership of achievements at all levels.
  3. Developing strategies to transform the culture and improve organizational performance.
  4. Facilitating dialogue to create open environments.

Length: 10 mins

Jim Rough | HOLUTION! ...How You and I Can Facilitate “We the People” to Solve Society’s BIG Impossible-to-Solve Problems

There are many within-system “solutions” to society’s BIG impossible-seeming problems including: educating people, fighting for legislation; raising consciousness, modeling behaviors, etc. But these are blocked because these approaches ignore our system. And the problems are features of our system. We need a “holution”—the kind of “solution” which addresses the underlying system.

Twenty-five years ago, I discovered such a “holution.” And ever since I’ve been working to bring it forward. Recently, some governments in Europe have taken it up, so we know it works at large scale. And it could work at the global scale. In simple terms, here’s a way you and I can facilitate all the people to come together, face the BIG problems creatively, figure out win/win solutions, and provide responsible leadership for implementation.

Learning Objectives

  1. Our current system of governance and economics is not sustainable; the system is causing society’s big intractable problems.
  2. To solve the problems and make our system sustainable, we must facilitate a way for all people to regularly “step back,” face the problems together and reach unity about what to do.
  3. Using the “Wisdom Council Process,” we can facilitate this stepping back at the global level… and at the national level in the U.S.
  4. This is not an option; our system assumes we are independent, but we are now increasingly interdependent, so we must all start working together.

Length: 10 mins

Luis Marrero | Are there Forces Countering Meaning-Centered OD? Learning from Field Experiences

Despite the publication, training, and practice of innovative meaning- and positive-centered theories and methods, key macro indicators pertaining employee engagement (Gallup), trust in leadership (Edelman), and happiness at work (Dr. Barry Schwartz; United Nations Happiness Report) remain stubbornly on negative terrain. Why is it that—despite encouraging empirical findings and a plethora of consulting firms and internal practitioners—do key success indicators remain stubbornly low?

Based on literature and field findings, Logoteleology theory posits that notwithstanding noble intentions many meaning= and positive-centered efforts fail or have limited long-term impact due to deep-seated archaic meaning conventions. These opposing forces are assumptions about the meaning and role of humans and organizations, many operating out of awareness. As long as these subconscious meanings continue to dominate leadership norms and to compete against positive- and meaning-centered initiatives, logoteleologists predict more of the same. Hence, how can researchers and practitioners partner to expose these underlying opposing assumptions in their improvement effort?

During the interactive presentation, we will share what the suspected opposing forces are, their sources, and explain how Organization Development practitioners leverage logoteleology’s (Meaningful Purpose Psychology) Identity Model (Meaning à Motivation à Purpose in Action à Consequence) and the AVR Method © (Meaning Awareness, Analysis, Validation, Replacement, and Reinforcement) to develop and promote meaningful leadership practices and prosperous organizations.

Learning Objectives

  1. How resistance shows up and how members of the audience address it.
  2. Logoteleology’s findings and approach.
  3. How to research the proposed countering forces that stymie improvements.

Length: 10 mins

Shizuka Modica | How Can We Strategically Promote Meaning-Centered Approaches?

Corporations still predominantly use Gallup’s Employee Engagement Survey (or something similar) as a proxy for employee productivity. Rightfully, corporations have spent substantial expenses on engagement initiatives; yet the employee engagement rate in the US has been steady over the past decade at around 31%. Given the situation, a big shift toward “meaningful work” is taking place. The corporate world now shows its readiness to try meaning-centered approaches to manage human productivity, more specifically human motivation for innovation and creativity, which are key drivers in surviving fast-changing business environments. At this juncture, how can researchers and practitioners strategically promote meaning-centered approaches to develop organizations?

This part of the symposium examines three to four meaning-centered models available or in use for organizational development purposes. Such models will be chosen from the Askinosie Chocolate Model, Lips-Wiersma and Morris’s Holistic Development Model, Chalofsky’s Meaningful Work Model, the Fairlie’s Meaningful Work Inventory, Bailey and Madden’s Elements of Meaningfulness Echosystem, the Conscious Capitalism Model by Sisodia, Henry and Eckschmidt, and Brafford’s Positive Professionals Model.

Learning Objectives

Participants will learn and discuss:

  1. How each model is designed
  2. How it may relate to employees’ experience, engagement, and/or organizational productivity
  3. How it is (or is not) integrated with leadership, positive psychology, and/or existential psychology
  4. How organizations can monitor meaningfulness and productivity measurements
  5. What challenges organizations may face using these models
  6. How best to promote meaning-centered approaches to organizational leaders

Length: 10 mins

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Summit on Second Wave Positive Psychology — Mature Happiness

2.0 CEUs | Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM

Track: Research

Panelists

  • Carol Ryff, Ph.D., Hilldale Professor of Psychology and Director of the Institute on Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Michael Steger, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Meaning and Quality of Life at Colorado State University
  • Ken Sheldon, Ph.D., Curator’s Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Director of the Sheldon Motivation Laboratory at the University of Missouri
  • Philip Watkins, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology at Eastern Washington University and researcher and author on gratitude and well-being
  • Tim Lomas, Ph.D., Lecturer in Positive Psychology at the University of East London and co-author of Second Wave Positive Psychology
  • Roger Tweed, Ph.D., Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University
  • Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D., Founder of Meaning Therapy and the International Network on Personal Meaning, and Professor Emeritus of Trent University

Moderator | Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Summit Abstract

From the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0), research on wellbeing needs to acknowledge that (a) human experiences always exists in polarity and involve a dialectical process; (b) there is a dark side to human nature and life is full of evil and suffering; and (c) a theory of global wellbeing needs to be based on the indigenous conceptions of happiness in different languages and cultures. Mature happiness refers to the kind of happiness that involves any or all of the above three basic tenets of PP 2.0. This summit will examine how these new considerations will impact both research and theorizing of happiness and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives

Participants will learn

  1. How happiness and sadness are two sides of the same coin, and one cannot truly understand happiness without sadness
  2. One’s experience of happiness and wellbeing is influenced by one’s language and culture
  3. Happiness across cultures can be measured by different dimensions
  4. The differences between different conceptions of happiness and wellbeing

Length: 2 hours

Carol Ryff | Ideals in Human Development

I will use my 10 minutes to talk about optimal in human capacities, thereby invoking a teleological stance that explicates what is valued.  Four key capacities are included: (1) personal awareness and sensitivity (knowing unique strengths and weaknesses, good and bad feelings plus being able to perceive and sense the emotions of others); (2) having wide-ranging and flexible repertoires that are properly attuned to situational contexts; (3) being capable of complex and even antithetical thoughts and feelings, such as “sublime pathos” (F. Schiller); (4) leading passionate lives of purpose – guided by objectives for which one is deeply committed. 

Ken Sheldon

I will consider the three propositions made by PP 2.0.  First, I agree (along with Self-determination theory) with the first two propositions that “human experiences always exist in dialectical polarity and that there is a dark side to human nature.”  However, I disagree that life is “full” of evil and suffering; humans evolved to be resilient and the average subjective well-being (SWB) score, world-wide, exceeds the mid-point.  I also disagree that the very definition of happiness needs to vary from culture to culture, and discuss the benefits of using SWB to compare cultures, since SWB provides an “honest signal” of human thriving that (arguably) transcends culture.

Philip Watkins | Gratitude and Happiness

In this brief presentation, I will overview research relevant to the relationship between gratitude and happiness. I will first review the many studies that have shown that gratitude is strongly related to various happiness measures in both cross-sectional and prospective studies, and I will show that gratitude is one of the most important strengths for happiness. As Diener has pointed out however, piling up many correlational studies does not indicate causation, and thus I will review over 40 experimental studies that have shown that gratitude actually causes increases in happiness. I will then provide a brief review of how gratitude encourages happiness and will encourage researchers to investigate this issue. Finally, I will present recent research which suggests that gratitude may be more important to eudaimonic than hedonic wellbeing.

Tim Lomas

Mainstream psychology is critiqued as being rather Western-centric, biased towards Western ways of thinking and understanding. Consequently, the field would benefit from greater cross-cultural engagement. One means of engagement is the study of “untranslatable” words (i.e., terms without an exact equivalent in another language). A key function of language is that it offers a “map” that allows us to understand and navigate the world. In that respect, such words point to cultural variation in the maps we use, and even to variation in the territory mapped. As such, this presentation will discuss how engaging with untranslatable words can enrich our understanding and appreciation of happiness.

Roger Tweed

Positive psychology 1.0 creates a problem because both the rhetoric and research practices tend to create an imbalanced vision of the good life. In particular, the rhetoric and research practices can suggest that the good life is a matter of doing what you are good at and being happy. For many people, this type of good life is difficult to attain. Research in positive psychology 2.0 suggests that the vision of the good life we promote in our research and rhetoric should include a broader array of constructs, including some that go back to the work of Aristotle: Eudaimonia and Wisdom.

Paul Wong | Mandala Model of Mature Happiness

Wong (2017) will present his mandala model of mature that is based on (a) the dialectic process of balancing between Yin and Yang, (b) the moral courage to do the right thing in the midst of temptations and adversities, (c) the cultivation of wisdom and spirituality to achieve inner harmony between self and others, autonomy and altruism. He will also present a hierarchical model of different types of happiness as well as a dimensional view of global wellbeing.

Symposium on Coaching and Personal Meaning: The Importance of an Integrative Meaning Perspective for Coaching Practice

1.0 CCE | Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

Track: Coaching

Panelists

  • Laura Atwood, PCC, BCC, ACPC, senior faculty of the Adler coaching program and past president of the Association of Coach Training Organizations (ACTO) and contributor to the ICF ethics policy
  • Gordon Medlock, Ph.D., board member of INPM and director of doctoral research in transformational coaching and leadership at the Wright Graduate University for the Realization of Human Potential
  • Reese Haydon, M.S., a Consultant in Cisco HR’s Leadership and Team Intelligence organization and manager of Cisco’s global coaching practice that democratizes a strengths-based coaching program throughout all levels of the organization
  • Rachel Newton, Ph.D., a career coach in private practice in Vancouver utilizing a meaning-focused coaching approach

Moderator | Gordon Medlock, Ph.D.

Symposium Abstract

The International Coaching Federation (ICF) defines coaching as “partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential. It represents a field of practice that is the legacy of the integrative psychology movement, drawing from a wide variety of traditions including the human potential movement, positive and existential psychology, developmental psychology, contemporary neuroscience, and other research.

This interactive symposium will address the question of the role and importance of an integrative personal meaning perspective in coaching practice. It will explore how effective coaches not only facilitate problem resolution and goal achievement, but also serve the parallel agenda of enabling clients to become their authentic best selves and live lives of greater meaning and purpose. It will discuss the distinctive ways that coaching enhances human performance and fulfillment, as distinguished from the related practices of psychotherapy, consulting, education, and mentoring.

The symposium will also explore the cutting edge of coach education and the increasing professionalization of coaching practice, including standards of practice developed through the Graduate School Alliance for Education in Coaching (GSAEC) and the ICF.

Panel participants will present a variety of coaching models that enable clients to enhance goal achievement and the emergence of individual and group potential in individual practice and organizational settings.

Learning Objectives

  1. Analyze the difference between goals coaching and the “parallel agenda” of facilitating the emergence of the whole person.
  2. Discuss how coaching differs from psychotherapy, consulting, teaching, and mentoring.
  3. Identify three benefits of the strengths-based approach to coaching in an organizational setting.
  4. Describe how questions of meaning and purpose are central to the process of career coaching.
  5. List three core coaching competencies included in the International Coaching Federation (ICF) competency model.

 

Laura Atwood | Meaning: The Golden Thread Woven throughout the Most Powerful Coaching

Meaning in coaching starts with the core question that underpins all of coaching: “What do you want?” And it’s important for us as coaches to go deeper and make sure that the client hears the real question of “What do you really, really want?” Not just what you think you should want, or what you’ve been told you should want, or what, maybe, you might try for. That deep-seated, personal want gives meaning, drive, energy, and focus to coaching, operating at all levels from the big, overarching goals for coaching, to the specific choices made in each conversation.

Meaning operates across the domains of coaching outcomes:

  • Identifying the “why bother?” or “what’s at stake?” that makes the hard work of enhancing performance worth the effort.
  • Recognizing that learning is always personal, and must be self-directed, based on the individual’s unique subjective perspective and process of meaning-making.
  • Enhances personal fulfillment as the client discovers wonderful things about their unique strengths, values, and contributions they can make to the world, and starts to come off autopilot and take the wheel in steering their own life.

Meaning invites the client to pay attention to how they’re being in the world, to notice what brings out the best in them, and what triggers their lesser self to show up, and to choose more intentionally how to be, more of the time. Through focus on self as an expression of meaning, the client engages in a process of intentional evolution and creation of the future self.

Meaning guides the client in designing action steps that are right for them, and supports them in holding themselves accountable to what’s truly important to them.

And meaning connects the client to the big picture of their life, so that they can align all their goals, choices and actions to their own design of purpose. Expression of meaning may change over time and place, but the constellation of internal elements of meaning, once discovered, can provide a valuable compass for a lifetime.

This rich parallel agenda, which can ride alongside a more concrete goals-focused agenda, offers the opportunity for meaning-focused transformation, and provides the great “Wow!” factor of coaching. And it fits comfortably within ICF’s Coaching Core Competencies, and can be mapped to ICF’s PCC markers.

Exploration of personal meaning is also a key element of coach formation, to enhance trust and presence, and to support client exploration at deeper levels.

Learning Objectives

  1. Highlight the many ways meaning underpins and/or expands coaching.
  2. Review how meaning shows up in the coaching relationship across time, and throughout each coaching conversation.
  3. Map meaning to ICF Coaching Core Competencies and PCC Markers as core elements &/or available opportunities for more expansive work.
  4. Connect to the importance of personal meaning exploration in the formation of coaches.

Length: 10 mins

Gordon Medlock | Emergence Coaching: An Integrative Paradigm for Facilitating Authentic Self-Emergence

This presentation defines emergence coaching as an integrative process for facilitating authentic self-emergence. It is distinguished from goals coaching in holding a broader, more integrative context for the work of coaching.As the coachee focuses on the specific outcome or intention for each session, he or she is also addressing the question of who she is becoming in the process of achieving specific goals and resolving identified problems.Thus, emergence coaching focuses not only on what the coachee wants to achieve, but more importantly on who she is becoming in the process.

This emergence coaching model has been developed over the course of 30 years of practice and research experience at the Wright Foundation, integrating developmental, existential, Adlerian, human potential, educational and neuroscience theories and methods, as well as an innovative application of ground theory methodology to the domain of coaching and leadership. The presentation includes a description of five phases of emergence coaching, including: yearning-based presence and engagement; discovering possibilities emerging in the moment; clarifying the core concept or theme that is the focus of emergence; visioning from the core concept to the ideal self;and designing the necessary actions (the “so-what”) that realize the vision towards which the client is emerging. The learning and growth is continually integrated through a purposeful living planning process where the client tracks progress in growth assignments, creates implementation intentions to convert vision to action, and develops a personal narrative of how the work relates to one’s overarching life purpose and values.

The presentation concludes with a discussion of International Coach Federation (ICF) competencies incorporated in emergence coaching and the importance of emotions and yearnings in facilitating experiences of personal meaning and purpose, in contrast to more cognitive approaches.

Learning Objectives

  1. Analyze the difference between goals coaching and the “parallel agenda” of facilitating the emergence of the whole person.
  2. Discuss how coaching differs from psychotherapy, consulting, teaching, and mentoring.
  3. List three core coaching competencies included in the International Coaching Federation (ICF) competency model.
  4. Discuss how grounded theory methodology is applied to the practice of emergence coaching.
  5. Analyze the relationship between the core concept and the visioning process in emergence coaching.

Length: 10 mins

Reese Haydon | Disrupting a Thriving Practice and Scaling Coaching Beyond the C-Suite: Cisco’s Story

Many misconceptions exist around the feasibility of offering coaching, a proven-effective talent activation strategy, beyond the C-suite. This session will explore Cisco’s strategy to scale coaching for its entire workforce and the impact of that effort. The conversation will be about the impact of coaching on the organization, focusing on not only how the organization made room for strengths-based coaching in a fast-paced tech environment, but also the process of certifying internal coaches to provide scale and breadth that no external provider could match. The speaker will also discuss the differentiators that make strengths-based coaching uniquely suited to a world in which any business is either being disruptive, or being disrupted.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how one organization successfully leveraged coaching as a strategic organizational change mechanism
  2. Case-study of how one organization shifted application of coaching from competency, deficit based to strengths based/positive psychology
  3. How to leverage technology for delivery and increased efficacy of coaching
  4. Get tips on overcoming resistance and enrolling others in a disruptive vision

Length: 10 mins

Rachel Newton | Why Integrate Meaning-Centered Coaching into your Practice?

70% of people don’t like or even hate their job/career (2017 Global Employee Engagement Index). As a career coach, I work collaboratively with my clients to help them be part of the 30% of engaged professionals. I am passionate and motivated to galvanize as many people as possible to be part of the 30%! My message during this symposium can offer a new perspective or inspire your coaching work.

I facilitate my clients to strategically manage their careers. Fundamental to the many techniques I use to achieve this objective, I employ a meaning-centric approach. I define meaning as something that the individual experiences as important and significant; clients are encouraged to articulate and explore their own path to find meaning. Some examples are creating meaning from suffering, spirituality or transformation.

I will present my collaborative process: Career Entrada supporting clients working through their career dilemma. It involves a framework customized to meet unique client needs; the consistent theme is facilitating clients to discover meaning, purpose and fulfillment in their careers and lives. I also employ holistic coaching that is an integration of cognitive, somatic and spiritual approaches.

I will demonstrate how my meaning-centered process, Career Entrada catalyzed a client’s transformation. From a place of feeling overwhelmed, lost and stuck; using meaning as the foundation and utilizing assessments including interests, skills and values in addition to other resources within and between sessions. The outcome was an empowered client who achieved self-actualization with a solid sense of meaning and purpose.

A career coach in private practice my focus is on the real-world application of meaning in the coaching arena. You’re invited to consider the benefits of integrating meaning-centered coaching with your clients. At minimum, this discussion should create curiosity for coaches who may not be utilizing a meaning-centric approach with clients.

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss how integrating a meaning perspective can be applied to practical client cases.
  2. Identify the benefits and challenges of integrating meaning-centered coaching into working with clients.
  3. Describe two scenarios where meaning-centric coaching would not be appropriate and explain why.
  4. Explain how the Career Entrada approach incorporates mind, body and spirit into the coaching process.

Length: 10 mins

Summit on Second Wave Positive Psychology — Meaning in Life

1.5 CEUs | Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM

Track: Research

Panelists

  • Gordon Carkner, Ph.D., Meta-Educator and Campus Chaplain at the University of British Columbia
  • Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D., Dr.Sc., Head of International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation, National Research University Higher School of Economics
  • Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D., Researcher and Lecturer at the Department of Counseling and Human Development at the University of Haifa and Head of the Academic Training Program for Logotherapy at Tel-Aviv University
  • Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D., Founder of Meaning Therapy and the International Network on Personal Meaning, and Professor Emeritus of Trent University
  • Piers Worth, Ph.D., Reader (Associate Professor) at Bucks New University
  • Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand., Administrative Director, Positive Psychology Research Center, Tsinghua University

Moderator | Seph Fontone Pennock, Co-founder of Positive Psychology Program and Entrepreneur

Summit Abstract

For the present Summit, we seek to break new grounds in meaning research from the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0). We will address some of the ignored areas in meaning research, such as (1) How important is one’s worldview? Does it make any difference whether you believe that life has inherent meaning and is worth living despite suffering, or whether you believe that life is inherently meaningless and nihilistic? (2) What is a meaning crisis? Why is it so prevalent? (3) Can we live a meaningful life by being engaged in certain worthy activities according to science, without addressing the dark side of life and the reality of suffering? (4) Can we feel fully alive and meaningful from the painful striving towards a worthy ideal? (5) What are the cultural differences regarding what kind of life is meaningful? (6) Why is self-transcendence (ST) an important area for meaning research?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understanding the importance of worldviews in shaping one’s experience of MIL
  2. Understanding the dark side of life and chaos as related to existential crisis
  3. Integrating science and religion in providing a fuller account of MIL
  4. Understanding the importance of self-transcendence in meaning and purpose

Length: 1.5 hours

Gordon Carkner | The Quest for Meaning Amidst Suffering

On the trajectory of the paper, Dr. Carkner sees a deep structure philosophical issue at work. In the West, according to eminent Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor, we are caught on the horns of a dilemma (Sources of the Self), within our immanent frame (A Secular Age): between self-hatred and moral lobotomy. Since identity, morality and spirituality are interwoven, Dr. Carkner will offer the possibility of a transcendent turn to agape love as a means to escape this dilemma of choosing either guilt/shame/low self-esteem or moral/spiritual suicide. This is one key strategy in grounding the self in robust meaning amidst suffering and tragedy.

Dmitry Leontiev | A Relational View on Meaning and Meaning-Making

Meaning is a link, a bridge connecting the inner and the outer world. Meaning-making is establishing (sometimes discovering as an insight, sometimes deliberately construing, sometimes imposing) the connection between one’s actions  and the world out there; correspondingly meanings regulate our thoughts and actions, giving them reason, direction and partiality. Most problems emerge from the fact that meaning-making contexts differ for different individuals, we put our actions to a restricted context of an incomplete picture. Meanings can be manipulated through manipulating contexts; every post-truth is in fact a part-truth. Comprehensive meaning-making suggest extending and combining the contexts.

Pninit Russo-Netzer

There has been a considerable shift recently in well-being research from the spotlight being on the ‘happiness’ question, to more of an emphasis on meaning and its search and consequences. This trend is also reflected in the dialogue regarding what drives the millennial generation.  Popular media sources are flooded with headlines such as “Millennials work for Purpose not Paycheck” and “Millennials Seek Deeper Meaning”. Interestingly, “igen” (or the younger half of millennials; Twenge), are experiencing unprecedented levels of anxiety, depression, alienation, and a sharp decline in life satisfaction. While meaning-seeking has never been a simple task, it seems that the twenty-first century presents its own set of challenges. Thus, we are being called to examine the prevalence of meaning crisis in the postmodern context. The millennial phenomenon reflects the general experience of youth when embarking on the quest for meaning, a journey that can leave one feeling lost, overwhelmed and alienated. It is imperative that we open a dialogue to create a community of meaning and cultivate a culture that helps youth in navigating today’s ever-changing world— both as a preventative perspective and in order to facilitate their healthy search for meaning.

Piers Worth

I approach the subject of ‘meaning’ as an educator rather than a researcher. I co-lead a ‘MAPP’ course. Positive psychology in so many ways gives language and means to explore stories, goals and meaning. I see students first explore socialised or culturally specified meaning, and then encounter  their own authentic sense of meaning. In doing this I’m convinced they move towards Wong’s (2017) model of ‘existential positive psychology’. The actions I most witness are students asking questions, and exploring their stories (e.g. McAdams 1988) as the vehicles of meaning. My priority is to explore ways of communicating and supporting ‘meaning’.

Yukun Zhao

A Big Data approach based on the lexica used on social media was applied to assess levels of PERMA (Positive emotion, Engagement, Relationship, Meaning, and Accomplishment; Seligman, 2012) of hundreds of millions of users in China. Using the 2014 data of Weibo (i.e. the Chinese version of Twitter), we found that while the level of emotion was the lowest on the day of Ya’an Earthquake, the worst natural disaster of China that year, the level of meaning was the highest on the same day, implying that natural disaster provoked more thoughts about meaning. Analysis of the 2016 Weibo found that, unlike emotion, engagement, relationship, and accomplishment, level of meaning of a city was not related to GDP per capita or population size, but positively correlated to the percentage of green space.

Symposium on Addiction

1.0 CEU | Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:15 PM

Track: Therapy

Panelists

  • Mark T. Blagen, Ph.D.
  • Sara Klinkhamer, M.A.
  • Geoff Thompson, Ph.D.

Symposium Abstract

Despite tens of millions of tax dollars poured into interventions, education, and enforcement since 2016, the opioid crisis continues to confound our best efforts to curb it. This symposium offers three views from humanistic-existential psychology, suggesting that a new approach would contribute significantly to helping those who succumb to addiction. Dr. Geoffrey Thompson argues that our current efforts to curb opioid addiction have done little because the experts do not agree on what addiction is or what to do about it. Although the experts are at the same table, they are playing solitaire, not addressing conflicting research from different disciplines. He suggests that using personal meaning as an organizing construct is capable of integrating current approaches. Dr. Mark Blagan sees the suffering of addiction as rooted in social disconnection. He proposes that the key component of therapy for those who are addicted is to help them make meaning of suffering as they rediscover social connections. Sara Klinkhamer proposes that those who are addicted suffer from an existential vacuum, and drug use is a response to this. She describes a meaning-centered therapy that helps clients discover answers to questions such as Who am?, How do I fit in the world?, and What is my meaning or purpose?

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn theoretical assumptions and principles of meaning-oriented therapies
  2. Identify differences and similarities between meaning and mainstream approaches to addictions
  3. Summarize key techniques and strategies of meaning-oriented therapies with addicted clients

 Length: 1 hour

Mark Blagen | Finding Meaning in Suffering: A Critical Component in the Recovery from Addiction Process

Many philosophical and most theological orientations suggest that suffering is an integral aspect of our existence. Addictive disorder for many is a response to suffering. Understanding the etiology and treatment of addictive disorders has evolved considerably in the last two decades. Traditional and folk-ways of understanding and treating addictive behavior have slowly given way to more scientific and theory basis for the development of effective interventions. An important outcome of this new way of understanding and treating addictive behaviors is a humanistic approach that empowers the individual suffering from an addictive disorder. Interventions such as Motivational Interviewing and HARM reduction encourage clients to be treated with more respect and to get beyond stigmatizing stereotypes and fully embrace what life could be in the absence of addiction. Meaning and purpose in life are at the core of these interventions. Alfred Adler proposed over 100 years ago that a predictor of mental health was how much social interest or community feeling an individual possessed. Adler who was greatly influenced by Nietzsche believed that this has to do with one’s will to power or according to Frankl, will to meaning. For Adler and Frankl, community feeling was a natural but crucial manifestation of meaning and purpose. Social interest or community feeling connotes an intentional connection to society. However, as globalization and other similar factors have dramatically stressed and fractured family and normal social connections, many have turned to addictive behavior for relief. Over time this remedy has a net result of greater pain, suffering and hopelessness. A key component to a successful recovery process is to make meaning of suffering as they rediscover social connections. This presentation will focus on ways a counselor can assist with this recovery process.

Sunday, August 5, 2018

Symposium on Positive Education: Facilitating Well-being through Meaning, Engagement, and Purposeful Relationships

1.0 CEU | Sunday, August 5, 2018, 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Track: Education

Panelists

  • Michael Bond, Ph.D.*, Emeritus Professor at Chinese University of Hong Kong & Visiting Chair Professor at the Polytechnic University of Hong Kong

  • Avraham Cohen, Ph.D., M.A., R.C.C., C.C.C., Private Practice Psychotherapist; Adjunct Faculty, Adler University

  • Hsiao-Chun Lin, Ph.D., MBA, Associate Professor of Institute of Education and Director of Humanity Office, Tzu Chi University

  • Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.*, Researcher and Lecturer at the Department of Counseling and Human Development at the University of Haifa & Head of the Academic Training Program for Logotherapy at Tel-Aviv University

Moderator | Chieh Hsu, M.A., APCC, Board of Directors, International Network on Personal Meaning

Symposium Abstract

In this symposium, we will focus on different models and processes to facilitate well-being through meaning, engagement, and/or purposeful relationships in educational settings across age groups, cultures, and countries. With each presenter’s distinctive cultural, spiritual, educational, and professional background, s/he will give a brief introduction on the model/practice and associated theoretical foundations. They will also share perceived benefits from qualitative or quantitative data as well as observed personal/ interpersonal/ institutional barriers throughout the process. Any learned lesson, tips for application, and future implications will also be discussed. At the end of the symposium, we also have a time for Q&A and welcome inspiring exchanges from all presenters and attendees.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify contextual considerations about well-being and meaning-making across cultures and countries
  2. Explore potential venues for educational leaders to facilitate meaning, engagement, and purposeful relationships
  3. Learn models/processes of creating and evaluating a sense of meaning and purposeful engagements
  4. Recognize benefits and barriers to facilitate meaning, engagement, and purposeful relationships at individual/group/institutional levels

Length: 1 hour

Michael Bond | Pursuits of Happiness… And Other Realizations of Well-being: The Pan-Cultural Quest

Social scientists have evidenced a growing interest in the bright side of life over the last three or so decades, as opposed to interest in the “dark side” which has emerged as a topic of fascination in organizational psychology. “Bright side” researchers have developed a host of conceptual distinctions on the good life and a welter of measures to assess the processes and the outcomes associated with attaining well-being. This academic ferment has bubbled up to organizational and governmental planning initiatives addressing concerns (in some cultural settings more than others!) about whether and how member and citizen well-being can be enhanced.

As a cross-cultural psychologist, I am concerned with: (1) Whether culturally distinctive conceptions of well-being are adequately represented in our literature (Mathews & Izquierdo, 2009); (2) Whether the various measures of well-being, both objective and subjective, are tapping the same underlying concept of living positively; (3) Whether processes for achieving well-being are distinguished from well-being outcomes, and models developed using the distinction between processes and outcomes; (4) Whether and how considerations involving different cultural contexts and the worldviews of its members are being represented in our models and their testing around our world. I will address these topics within the limitations of my academic and personal-cultural background, hoping to stimulate a conversation involving both audience and presenters. As an educator at the university level, I will try to apply these questions in general to the academic context in which I have taught for the last 50 years and in particular to the class on cross-cultural management that I have taught for six years.

Avraham Cohen | Inner World, Relationship, and Classroom Community Relational Field as Core to Full Engagement and Meaning in the Schoolroom and in Life

A primary pedagogic and curricular focus that provides in a structured and enactive way the underpinning for development of individual, relational, and community connection, bonding, and understanding of self and other(s) is essential to development of an environment that is pregnant with meaning. As well, how such experience is blocked within the inner and relational world, and how to work with this in creative and generative ways that include understanding the stuck and sticky points in our own consciousness, and how to facilitate what “wants” to happen is key to developing a loving, caring, compassionate, passionately alive, and meaningful experience within classroom environments. This presentation will touch on theory and the practices for creating conditions for facilitating and optimizing the experience for individual and community growth. Such facilitation, and the role of the educational leader with this, it will be argued, grows the roots for a felt sense of meaning for students and educators.

Hsiao-Chun Lin | Life Education in Taiwan: The Meaningful Roles of Adult Volunteers and Mentoring Service on Campus

In Taiwan, the term “life education” started in 1997 on campus, transformed from ethic education in high school. Since 2001, it was coordinated with ethic, life and death, and religion and spirituality education and gradually promoted into all high schools, colleges, and universities through curriculums or school systems.

Tzu Chi University was established in eastern Taiwan in 1994, to raise the level of medical care and higher education for this less-developed area of Taiwan. The founder, a female Buddhist Dharma Master Cheng Yen (1937-), after dedicating her life to compassion relief work for poor people and establishing a hospital via the Tzu Chi Foundation, realized that sickness is the root of agony and poverty and began organizing and building nursing and medical colleges in Hualien. Therefore, Tzu Chi University has in common their vision and mission with Tzu Chi Foundation, with the mission of education as one of the Foundation’s “Four Vacations and Eight Footprints.” Therefore, the school system of Tzu Chi in Taiwan has created the meaningful roles of adult volunteers and mentoring service on campus for students far from their hometown.

With this in mind, that “Life is a journey: We board an express train at birth and head for the unavoidable destination of death. The scenery drifts by, and the only meaningful thing we can do is to be good and kind to our fellow passengers,” and with the faith of “We will send our love and care to wherever help is needed, transcending the differences of race, religion and nationality,” Master Cheng Yen has translated Buddhist teachings for the need of modern society and teaches Tzu Chi volunteers to realize the true meaning of life and how to learn self-discipline and help others in their communities. With the spirit and calling of Buddhism, although Tzu Chi’s volunteers come from a variety of social-economic backgrounds, they have the same faith to spread great love.

I will take the example of Tzu Chi University’s unique design of its student life guidance system called Tzu-Cheng (sincere and authentic) Dads and Yi-Te (good virtue) Moms, who are elected from Tzu Chi volunteers in Taiwan. Tzu Chi moms and dads have become the students’ confidants, listening to things they find difficult to tell their own parents or guardians. This is a great opportunity for volunteers to get to know students better and offer encouragement and guidance, which is needed during the life stage of being a young adult. After 24 years, how to organize the volunteering works into the need of university’s operation and development is still a challenge for its faculty and staff. However, since it has been a unique campus culture and always sponsored by Tzu Chi Foundation, the meaningful roles and its good effect on students and teachers can be analyzed by some data and narrative.

Pninit Russo-Netzer | Nurturing the Spark of Meaning in Children: Empirical and Practical Implications of Viktor Frankl's Pathways to Meaning in Life

Meaning in life, which is almost unanimously recognized as a fundamental component of subjective well-being, has received little research attention when it comes to children, presumably due to a lack of suitable measurement tools for this age range. This talk will include a brief presentation of a study which provides evidence for the effect of meaning in life on the well-being of elementary school children aged 9–12 in Israel, through the development of Meaning in Life in Children Questionnaire (MIL-CQ), a new 21-item self-report measure of the presence and the sources of meaning in life in children, based on Viktor Frankl’s concept of the ‘meaning triangle’. Based on these three pathways to meaning in life, the talk will also present an initial intervention program through which educators may facilitate development of a healthy sense of meaning and the shaping of a purposeful path from a young age. 

The Dialogue Between PP 2.0 and OMAK

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 11:45 AM – 1:00 PM

Track: Education

Panelists

  • Jack Junn-Chung Huang, Ph.D., The Bliss and Wisdom Foundation of Culture and Education, Director of Department of Higher-Education Faculty and staff Services

  • Chian-Tian Lin, Ph.D., Project Assistant Professor, General Education Center, Far East University, Taiwan

  • Anna Shan Chun Hsu, Ph.D., Institutional Research Analyst, Pitzer College

  • Hsiaowen Chang, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Early Childhood Education, Nanhua University, Taiwan

Moderator | Kuen-Yung Jone, Ph.D.Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan

Symposium Abstract

Observe Merits and Appreciate Kindness (OMAK) is a concept and practice that originated from the founder of the Bliss and Wisdom Group, Late Master Jih-Chang, who integrated and organized contents from Master Tsong-Kha-Pa’s The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (also known as Lamrim, 1988) to provide individuals philosophies for self-cultivation. OMAK is applicable regardless of people’s religious affiliations. It is tightly enwrapped with people’s psychological needs to leave suffering and obtain happiness.

Individuals should start practicing OMAK by first listening and constructing the correct notion, then engaging through guided practice to establish systematic, step-by-step learning connotation. Late Master Jih-Chang initially promoted OMAK in Lamrim classes hosted by the Bliss and Wisdom Group, and later in 1994, incorporated OMAK into the annual Bliss and Wisdom Teachers Life Camp hosted in Taiwan. Today, there are more than 100,000 OMAK learners worldwide. This will be the first time we introduce the philosophies of OMAK at a western psychology conference, and this symposium will feature a series of presentations that synthesize OMAK theories and introduce its empirical practices. We hope this eastern self-cultivating philosophy, together with western positive psychology and the push for gratitude journals, can effectively complement one another to allow more interested individuals to benefit from learning OMAK.

The symposia consist of four presentations. The first presentation introduces the concept and practice of OMAK and discusses how it contributes and integrates with life education and lifelong learning. The second presentation aims to conceptualize OMAK as a process of self-cultivation, which includes cultural and universal ideals of a full-grown person (君子). The third presentation is a dialogue between PP 2.0 and OMAK. The researcher strove to connect her experiences with various theories related to PP 2.0 to illustrate the important roles the associations between OMAK and positive emotions and between OMAK and adversarial growth played in transforming her knowledge, behavior, and attitude towards life. The last article is a case study about two kindergarten teacher’s journeys of commitment through the practice of OMAK.

Jack Junn-Chung Huang | The Idea and Practice of OMAK and its Contributions to Life Education and Lifelong Learning

The current study examines the idea and practice of Observe Merits and Appreciate Kindness (OMAK) and discusses how OMAK contributes and integrates with the development of life education and lifelong learning. Analysis for this study includes quotes from Master Tsong-Kha-Pa’s The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (Lamrim), speeches from the founder of the Bliss and Wisdom group, the late Venerable Master Jih-Chang, and empirical studies related to OMAK. This study also provides insightful interpretation and analysis of OMAK in: (1) the contexts of the ongoing changes and movements in Eastern culture, (2) the promotion of life education and lifelong learning, as well as (3) the development of Western Positive Psychology, and (4) the push of gratitude journals, and so forth. Our findings indicate that OMAK stems and extends from Lamrim, and includes four theoretical frameworks: (1) using mindfulness (sati) to observe and replace the restraints set by past habitual reliance on personal decisions for suffering or happiness; (2) utilizing clear comprehension (sampajanna) to assist internal thoughts while orienting toward value and path developments that emphasized spirituality and materialism as the main and supplementary components respectively; (3) practicing at all times role and frame switching of self and others to foster considerate and altruistic mindset; and (4) cultivating compassion by listening, tolerating, accepting, and accompanying others while practicing to actively appreciate kindness through the idea of “showing appreciation for others just as others would do the same for you.”

In addition to the four theoretical frameworks, OMAK includes three stages of operational modes: (1) regardless of religious affiliations and tightly engrossed with psychological needs to leave suffering and obtain happiness, individuals should start by listening and constructing the correct notion, then engage through guided practice to establish systematic, step-by-step learning connotations; (2) planning lifelong learning environments that balance theory and practice, creating social experience platforms, and supporting individual practices and learning; and (3) developing lifelong learning directions that focus on spirituality while encouraging individuals to operate based on the premise of striving to improve their lives during every lifetime and enrich the connotations of life education.

OMAK contributes to life education and lifelong learning in five ways: (1) OMAK helps learners to elevate their spirituality, seek positive attitudes and meanings toward life, and reverse undesirable thinking habits as well as social culture of pursuing materialism and seeking personal gains or profits; (2) OMAK assists and strengthens important lifelong learning abilities, which encourages individuals to learn to engage in “learning from things and events”; (3) OMAK’s mode of operation tightly connects with the five main pillars of lifelong learning and motivates learners to actively and autonomously initiate their willingness to participate and learn; (4) OMAK elevates humanistic care and moral quality to establish foundations for positive social morale; and (5) OMAK opens the door of systematic, positive thinking for participants, which would allow educators to consider the importance of integrating the beliefs, morals, ethics, and various values into life education and lifelong learning.

Lastly, the present study raises five challenges of OMAK as well as future directions to serve as references for further research and practices.

Chian-Tian Lin | Shaping of Cultural Ideal Self: Observe Merits and Appreciate Kindness (OMAK) as a Process of Self-Cultivation

This article aims to conceptualize Observe Merits and Appreciate Kindness (OMAK) as a process of self-cultivation, which includes cultural and universal ideals of full-grown person. Based on the cultural anthropological assumption of possessive individualism, the development of modern society fosters rapid progression of material and technical culture. At the same time, possibilities to establish personal life and social system based on human mind are ignored. Problems of modern society are supposed to be dispelled through fine self-cultivation. From the viewpoint of Emptiness, fine self-cultivation treats self, others, world and the relationships among them differently. Therefore, characters resolving difficulties of life are presented. MMS emphasizes that ideal selves could be made through process of the interaction between practical reflection and internalization of knowledge. Naive system of OMAK including fundamental belief, Five Outlines, and Four Routes is analyzed from the framework of MMS. OMAK admits the pleasure principle and sociality of individuals. Guides concerning internalization of Confucianism and Buddhism knowledge and practical reflection of daily life are integrated. Full-grown person who completely utilizes the potential of mind would be developed through the process of OMAK. According to these characters, OMAK is conceptualized as a process of fine self-cultivation. Proposed as a process of self-cultivation, naive system of OMAK would be suitable for different groups in more effective way. Future researches concerning OMAK are discussed.

Anna Shan Chun Hsu | Wisdom and Action in Posttraumatic Growth: A Dialogue Between OMAK and PP 2.0

Observe Merits and Appreciate Kindness (OMAK) refers to the practice of purposely observing others’ virtues and merits in daily life, then expressing gratitude for the kindness others have shown us. The concept of OMAK originated from the founder of the Bliss and Wisdom Group, Venerable Master Jih-Chang, who integrated contents from Master Tsong-Kha-Pa’s The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (1988) to create simple concepts and methods that serve as guiding principles for Buddhism disciples’ daily practice of doing good deeds in life. The present article is based on foundations laid out in Lin and Jone (2016) and attempts to bring together the essence of Positive Psychology 1.0 and Positive Psychology 2.0 by discussing research on positive psychology and presenting a dialogue between positive psychology and OMAK, a concept that encompasses connotations of gratitude, expansion of positive emotions, and philosophy of posttraumatic growth. This dialogue also reflects the potential of expanding the understanding of positive psychology in eastern cultures. Lastly, this article presents one of the researcher’s narratives describing life challenges she had experienced. The researcher connects her experiences with various theories associated with PP 2.0 (such as Hwang’s Mandala Model of Self, 2011) to illustrate the important roles the associations between (1) OMAK and positive emotions and (2) OMAK and adversarial growth, play in transforming her knowledge, behavior, actions, and attitude towards life. Taken together, the dialogue and narrative seek to establish a positive psychology model that incorporates views from Buddhism to serve as a systematic basis for future research and interventions.

Hsiaowen Chang | What Keeps Her Going? A Kindergarten Teacher’s Journey of Commitment Through the Practice of OMAK

Researchers and educators unanimously stress the importance of creating a caring classroom for young children where the child is valued and cared for and where the child can live up her/his potential (Goodman, 2008; Nowak-Fabrykowski & Caldwell, 2002; Swick & Brown, 1999). In general, a caring classroom includes teachers who are warm, sensitive, and who notice when children are struggling emotionally or cognitively, and respond appropriately (Thomason & La Paro, 2013). Researchers suggest that teachers with strong commitment are likely to invest their time and energy in taking part in school activities, improving their teaching, and making themselves better teachers (Berk, 1985; Cho, 2012; Thomason & La Paro, 2013). Thus, it stands to reason that studying the factors contributing to teacher commitment is an important way to extend the understanding of the quality early childhood classroom.

It is clear that teachers’ commitment is resulted from a myriad of factors, including extrinsic and intrinsic rewards. Extrinsic rewards such as wages and school conditions, and student characteristic may be important incentives, they are not necessarily the primarily reasons that prompt early childhood teachers to commit to their jobs (Greene, 1999; Hall-Kenyon, Bullough, MacKay, & Marshall, 2014). Intrinsic rewards such as meaningfulness, purposefulness, and significance may be the key players in constructing teachers’ commitment. This study thus proposes to shift the focus from extrinsic motivation to intrinsic motivation of teacher commitment. Drawing results from a qualitative inquiry with a seasoned early childhood teacher in Taiwan, this paper provides preliminary data regarding how an early childhood teacher navigates her professional journey through harvesting intrinsic rewards via the practice of Observe Merits and Appreciate Kindness (OMAK), which in turn fuels her commitment to the field.

The practice of OMAK, derived from Buddhism, refers to developing the habits of observing the good in others and appreciating others’ kindness. OMAK works on reversing people’s deep-rooted habit of observing and dwelling on others’ faults and shortcomings by looking for the positive qualities others possess and focusing on what others have done for us. Through the practice of OMAK, people learn to appreciate what they have, what good life presents them, and what others have given them. When we are thankful for what we have received, we want to give in return. As a result, when a teacher feels grateful and acknowledges what others have done for her in her job as a teacher, a powerful dynamic is created in which she desires to give back to her profession. This study is thus set out to investigate how an early childhood teacher cultivates commitment to teaching through the practice of OMAK.

Workshops

Thursday, August 2, 2018
Friday, August 3, 2018

Unpacking Educational Experience to Better Understand its Role in Lifelong Well-Being | Carol Ryff, Ph.D., 1.0 CEU

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

Workshop Facilitator: Carol Ryff, Ph.D., Hilldale Professor of Psychology and Director of the Institute on Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Track: Education

Abstract

Extensive prior empirical research documents that people with higher educational attainment have higher well-being, better health, and live longer. Despite these ubiquitous findings, little is known about how educational attainment matters for these outcomes. What is it that the educational experience provides? Does the kind of education one obtains (e.g., field of study, such as liberal arts training versus science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) training) matter? As people move across the decades of adult life, what reflections do they have about what their educational training did/did not contribute to living a full and virtuous life? Among those who did not have opportunities for formal higher education, what self-education practices might have mattered for their well-being? The aim of the workshop will be, via these questions, to stimulate reflection and discussion that reach toward the larger objective of promoting research and practice to better understand how education matters for human well-being.

Learning Objectives

  1. Briefly review evidence showing that high educational standing matters for key life outcomes (well-being, health, length of life)
  2. Engage workshop participants in discussion of what components of formal education (degrees, majors) might matter for lifelong well-being and how
  3. Engage workshop participants in retrospective evaluations regarding their own past educational experiences (teachers, courses, readings) that have mattered for their own well-being and why
  4. Facilitate group discussion about how to promote, in research and practice, a deeper understanding of the nexus between education and well-being

Biography

Carol D. Ryff, Ph.D. is Director of the Institute on Aging and Hilldale Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research centers on the study of psychological well-being, an area in which she has developed multidimensional assessment scales that have been translated to more than 30 different languages and are used in research across diverse scientific fields. More than 750 publications have been generated using her scales of well-being. Investigations by Dr. Ryff and colleagues have addressed how psychological well-being varies by age, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnic/minority status, and cultural context as well as by the experiences, challenges, and transitions individuals confront as they age. Whether psychological well-being is protective of good physical health is also a major interest, with ongoing longitudinal investigations linking positive psychosocial factors to a wide array of biomarkers (neuroendocrine, immune, cardiovascular) as well as to neural circuitry. A guiding theme in much of this inquiry is human resilience—i.e., how some individuals are able to maintain or regain their well-being in the face of significant life challenges and what neurobiology underlies this capacity.

Dr. Ryff has generated over 200 publications in the areas described above, and she currently directs the MIDUS (Midlife in the U.S.) longitudinal study, which is based on a large national sample of Americans, including twins. Funded by the National Institute on Aging, MIDUS has become a major forum for studying health and aging as an integrated biopsychosocial process. She is also Principal Investigator of MIDJA (Midlife in Japan), a parallel to the MIDUS investigation, for which she received an NIH Merit Award.

The Neuroscience of Empathy, and the Psychology and Philosophy of What Gives Life Meaning | Digby Tantam, Ph.D. | 1.0 CEU

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

Workshop Facilitator: Digby Tantam, Ph.D., FRC.Psych., Emeritus Professor, University of Sheffield

Track: Research

Abstract

Jeremy Bentham had a more nuanced approach to life-satisfaction than his felicific calculus. “For every grain of enjoyment you sow in the bosom of another, you shall find a harvest in your own bosom…” (quoted in my book, Emotional Well-Being and Mental Health). Many others have concluded something similar. Frankl discovered in the concentration camps that “a man who becomes conscious of the responsibility he bears toward a human being who affectionately waits for him… will never be able to throw away his life.” Both Bentham’s and Frankl’s statements ring true, but why? One possible explanation is that human beings are emotionally connected to each other, a connection that is often termed intersubjectivity or affective empathy. Empathy (or, to use David Hume’s term, sympathy) is an attractive explanation, but it runs counter to an equally well-established theorem of common-sense psychology, that we are all motivated by what we can get out of life, whether than is happiness, or celebrity, or even meaning. On this account, other people only matter inasmuch as they are possible tools to reach our own selfish goals the better.

These two philosophies of life—caring for others or looking out for number one—have been debated on ethical rather than empirical grounds. In my recent book, The Interbrain, I have reviewed the growing evidence for a biological basis for emotional connections between people and for their enhanced or suppression by psychological factors, most likely mediated by prefrontal areas of the brain. These factors, sometimes described as “narrative” or “theory of mind” have been intensively studied, but the combination of psychological and biological processes in making emotional connections have not.

In my workshop, I will consider how these two facets of emotional connection or disconnection can be applied to work with individuals, and in groups, to enhance personal meaning.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Provide the evidence for connected attention and emotion systems between human brains (“the interbrain”)
  2. Differentiate types of “empathy” including theory of mind, the interbrain (sometimes called affective empathy), and disgust
  3. Apply this knowledge to situations in which life gains or loses meaning

Biography

Digby Tantam, Ph.D. is a psychotherapist, counsellor, psychologist, and psychiatrist. He is Deputy Principal of the New School of Psychotherapy and Counselling and teaches there regularly as well as gives invited lectures and workshops at home and abroad. He is a trustee of the Federation of Existential Therapists in Europe and co-chaired the first meeting of the World Confederation of Existential Psychotherapy. He has published over 120 scientific articles and 15 books. His most recent is The Interbrain published in 2017 by Jessica Kingsley Press. His book Emotional Well-being and Mental Health was published by Sage in 2014.

Emotional Intelligence: Rising Up in the Face of Organizational Dis-Ease | Heathere Evans, APR

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

Workshop Facilitator: Heathere Evans, M.A., APR, Executive Coach with Pivot, Inc.

Track: Coaching

Abstract

In an era marked by epidemic forms of dis-ease in the workplace, how can we help unhealthy organizations heal and detoxify work environments so that they stay healthy? The answer is not more effort—it’s more wisdom.

Emotional intelligence is at the top of conversations in every level of business today. Work is full of busyness and overwhelming, involving managing multiple directives and juggling personality differences in order to be successful. On any given day, navigating the landscape and finding meaning can seem hopeless. Whether you see yourself as a leader or not, it is imperative that each one of us take a leadership role in learning how to use emotional intelligence to support the health of our organizations. Emotional intelligence comprises skills in five specific areas—all of which fall under the domain of communications. In this session, participants learn how to use brain-body science to master the inner and outer conversation, sustain healthier work environments, cultivate self-awareness, claim more mental dominion, build resiliency, reduce stress, and enhance wellbeing in the workplace. Tangible tools and exercises complete the experience designed to arm participants with practices they can use to feel clearer, empowered, and energized in their professional and personal lives.

Learning Objectives

Participants will learn to:

  1. Redirect negative energy into positive and productive outcomes
  2. Use challenges as an opportunity for self-discovery and mental skill-building
  3. Build new and more effective communications skills
  4. Resolve work conflicts and develop more effective ways of relating to self and others
  5. Cultivate skills in resilience and emotional intelligence

Biography

Heathere Evans, APR, is a professional communicator, coach, and trainer. Fusing together a 20-year career in communications with a background in advanced psychology and brain science, Evans provides a unique blend of empowering workshops, talks, and one-on-one coaching programs for professionals seeking mastery in both their professional and personal lives. Topics include emotional intelligence in the workplace, branding, creating authentic success, leading with heart and vision, conquering the inner critic, and delivering powerful public addresses. High-profile executives and organizations such as Hewlett-Packard, MedStar Health, U.S. Department of Energy, the National Bar Association, and the Independent Community Bankers of America use her transformative services.

Named Washington PR Woman of the Year 2011, Evans has served young professionals, fellow entrepreneurs, and women and children’s causes for decades. She founded a member-run organization to support independent business owners and served as Board President and member of the Board of Directors for PRSA-NCC, the largest chapter of the Public Relations Society of America. Evans has mentored and coached other professionals, served as guest lecturer at leading academic institutions, and has published articles on business, success, leadership, and personal growth topics.

Evans holds a bachelor’s degree in communications, a master’s in psychology, and is a certified coach with credentials in Success Intelligence™, integrative psycho-synthesis and consciousness health and healing. She earned her Accreditation in Public Relations in 2003, one of the highest designations in the communications industry, governed by the Universal Accreditation Board. She currently lives in Los Angeles.

A Co-Op Semester for Fostering Purpose in Life in Students | Luis Gutiérrez Aladro, Ph.D.

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Workshop Facilitator: Luis Antonio Gutiérrez Aladro, Ph.D., Academic Vice-President, Universidad Tecmilenio

Track: Education

Abstract

Tecmilenio University (private non-profit, founded in 2002), has 56,000 students, 1,800 administrators, and 4,500 adjunct teachers in 29 campuses across Mexico, and has adopted an institutional approach that embeds the principles of positive psychology (PP) into pedagogy and school culture. In 2013, Tecmilenio University created a new curriculum that includes a comprehensive wellbeing program (called ecosystem of wellbeing and happiness) for all educational levels and established a new vision: “To help people define their purpose in life and provide them with the competencies to achieve it.” The aim is to promote student and staff wellbeing and help them build purposeful lives.

The ecosystem includes PERMA components (Seligman, 2011) plus physical wellness and mindfulness. This model is framed by personal strengths (Peterson & Seligman, 2004). Students, school leaders, and faculty participate in this ecosystem that extends beyond the application of student-focused PP interventions and where research and best practices are integrated.

This multidimensional model emphasizes the main routes to infuse PP into the whole institution: (1) Introducing PP academic programs for all educational levels; (2) Launching co-curricular activities aligned with our model (called Wellbeing and Student Development Program); (3) Training for teachers so they can apply PP components in the classroom level; (4) Training for school leaders and staff in positive organizational psychology to learn positive leadership skills; (5) Implementing changes into the facilities and physical environment so that it is more in line with the principles of PP, such as healthy cafes in all campuses or gyms.

In their third year, students are required to do a Co-Op semester, where they have to be full-time (40 hours per week) in a company to develop the competences related to one of the minors they select in their program. Additionally, they have to do two projects while being in the company for six months: one project is related to prospective business opportunities for the company; the second project is to do a positive organization intervention. The positive organization intervention is based on obtaining positive results for the company while embedding an abundance framework based on theories like Marisa Salanova’s HERO model and Kim Cameron’s learnings (Center for Positive Organizations from the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business). One of the great results of this semester, besides obtaining the company’s satisfaction, is that students report being highly involved with their project(s) and finding meaning in the work they do.

Learning Objectives

Participants will learn to:

  1. Explain the implementation process
  2. Show the evidence of success and company’s satisfaction as demonstrated by different instruments.
  3. Encourage participants to implement similar interventions in their companies (or asking for companies to do it) in order to help students discover or foster their purpose in life

Biography

Luis Gutierrez Aladro, B.Cs.Mgmt., M.A., Ph.D. in Innovation and Educational Technology. With more than 20 years in education, Luis has been not only a teacher in the fields of management, strategic business, and creativity, but also a leader in Tecnológico de Monterrey at Saltillo Campus, first at the international trade major, then as head of undergraduate programs and also as Director of Students Affairs.

In 2011, he was appointed as Academic VP for Universidad Tecmilenio, where he designs and deploys an experience for more than 34,000 high school and undergraduate students to help them develop their purpose in life and the competencies to achieve it. Luis has led projects in educational innovation, designing and implementing programs related to classroom techniques like PBL, Case Method, Flipped Classroom, and Competence-Based Learning. He also works in curricular design, teacher training, and student life. He has also been fully engaged in the design of Tecmilenio’s wellbeing and happiness ecosystem, as well as the design of the actual unique university’s approach to education.

Luis has been a speaker in international forums like the NAFSA Association of International Educators, the National Association of Student Affairs Administrators, CIIE (Educational Innovation International Congress), IPPA, and IPEN, where he has a role as Global Representative. He is certified in Positive Psychology and Positive Organizations. Luis is an innovator, passionate about education, and a family-oriented person. He believes that is possible to transform a country through education and works everyday with that in mind.

The Individual’s Meaning Profile: Its Nature and Assessment | Shulamith Kreitler, Ph.D. | 1.0 CEU

Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Workshop Facilitator: Shulamith Kreitler, Ph.D., School of Psychological Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Israel

Track: Research

Abstract

The workshop will focus on presenting a system of meaning which is based on a new approach to meaning including a theory, methodology for assessment, a large body of studies, and a method for intervention and change. The applications of the new system are in the domains of personality, emotions, health, communication and cognition. In line with this approach, meaning is defined as a pattern of meaning values focused on a referent, whereby the referent is the input to which meaning is assigned (e.g., a stimulus, an object, an event) and the meaning values function as descriptions or manifestations of the meaning.

Assessment of meaning consists in analyzing the descriptions of meaning in terms of six different variables, such as the contents (e.g., function, emotions) and various formal characteristics (e.g., positive, conjunctive, normative). When meaning descriptions are elicited by a standard set of stimuli (i.e., the Test of Meanings), the analyses of the meaning communications are summarized and constitute the individual’s meaning profile, which represents the frequencies with which the individual used each of the meaning variables. The profile represents the dominant meaning assignment tendencies of the individual. As such it helps in identifying the variables which are used by the individual in comprehension, problem solving, decision making etc., as well as those that the individual does not use.

There are identified correlates of the meaning profile in the domains of cognition, personality traits and tendencies and emotions. The participants in the workshop will learn to analyze the meaning communications (manually or by means of a computer program), to interpret the profile, to identify its correlates and to train individuals in enhancing meaning variables and applying them in regard to overcoming stress, promoting resilience, and enhancing one’s wellbeing. The workshop will be interactive, with demonstrations, discussions, and hands-on experience in constructing and applying a meaning profile.

Learning Objectives

  1. To provide the participants an introduction to the nature of meaning and its different assessment means
  2. To describe the Kreitler Meaning System—its underlying assumptions and its benefits in the framework of psychology
  3. To teach the participants how to use the Kreitler computer program for analyzing meanings of different kinds
  4. To enable the participants to construct an individual’s meaning profile and interpret its personal characteristics

Biography

Shulamith Kreitler, Ph.D., was born in Tel-Aviv, and received her Ph.D. at Bern University, Switzerland. She has been a full professor of psychology at Tel-Aviv University since 1986, and worked at the universities of Princeton, Harvard, Yale, Vienna, and Buenos Aires. She is a certified clinical psychologist and health psychologist. She established (in 1993) the Psycho-oncology Unit at Ichilov and (in 2007) the Center for Psycho-oncology Research at the Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, and still functions as its Director. Her major publications are in cognition, personality, health psychology, and motivation, with an emphasis on identifying the factors enabling the understanding, prediction, and change of behaviors. She has developed a new approach to the conceptualization, assessment, and study of meaning, which is known as the Kreitler System of Meaning and is preparing a book for Cambridge University Press about the theory and methodology of meaning. She currently teaches the essentials of meaning at Tel-Aviv University and in workshops around the world.

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Meaning-Making in Counsellor Education Classrooms | Avraham Cohen, Ph.D., Jade Ho, Ph.D., and Heeson Bai, Ph.D. | 1.5 CEU

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM

Workshop Facilitators: Avraham Cohen, Ph.D., RCC, CCC, Adjunct Faculty, Adler University; Jade Ho, Ph.D. Cand., Simon Fraser University, and Heesoon Bai, Ph.D., RCC, University of British Columbia

Track: Education

Abstract

A most notable characteristic about human beings is their ability and propensity to make and hold meaning, which is made possible by their being symbol-processing creatures. Henceforth, loss of meaning as well as entertaining unhelpful and possibly even destructive meaning-making negatively contributes to the vitality and viability of human beings. Given this, one of the primary tasks of counsellors and psychotherapists is working skillfully with their own and clients’ meaning-making abilities and patterns. How well are our counselling students prepared in this domain of competency? In our presentation, we put forth a number of theses towards developing a counsellor education model that immerses student counsellors in a rich, generative, and unique approach to their own, and their clients’ practice and experience of meaning-making and transformation.

The first thesis we present is that meaning-making for humans involves relationality, intersubjectivity, and inter-being with relationship beyond the human. Experience takes place in dyadic as well as collective “containers” of relationality, within the classroom learning environment. Counsellor education that does not offer opportunity for students to experience such an environment is inadequate in educating future counsellors, and no amount of content-focused education will provide remediation. From this ground, we present our research on creating and facilitating a counsellor education classroom that modelled meaning-making through personal inner work and relationality and documented how students participating in this research expressed what they learned from the process.

The second thesis we present is that intersubjective meaning-making is core to the “therapeutic alliance” that research shows to be the greatest indicator of therapy efficacy. A core idea is that classrooms present an untapped opportunity to learn about groups, leadership, inner life, relationship, and community development that has implications for counselling practice, inner and inter-subjective life, along with philosophical and theoretical knowledge development. The felt sense that one’s psychotherapist really understands and knows him/her is essential to their together exploring unfamiliar mental and emotional landscapes where transformation possibilities await the client. Similarly, the felt-sense that the educator and one’s peers within the learning context really understand and that a person is known in their humanness and vulnerability is core to learning in an integrated way about their own growth and the facilitation of growth and transformation for clients.

The workshop will be presented in a way that is highly interactive and engaging and provides a demonstration and experience of the approach taken that leads to high student and educator engagement, and that facilitates meaning and transformation that is integrated with learning of the professional skills, ethics, and ways of being.

Learning Objectives

Participants will

  1. Understand the emergence of meaning as a phenomenon integral to the facilitative and conscious leadership practice in a classroom and other learning environments;
  2. Understand the emergence of meaning as an intersubjective phenomenon within and between all participants in the educational process;
  3. Understand the development deep democracy practice, ethics of care, and a relational field in learning environment;
  4. Understand the process of developing a safe learning environment through these practices;
  5. Learn the philosophy and practice of inner work as key to creating conscious leadership that works with inner and relational development.

Biographies

Avraham Cohen, Ph.D., R.C.C., C.C.C., has been working in the field of counselling and psychotherapy for 48 years, and has conducted a private practice for individuals, couples, and groups since 1987. He has also been associate-director for a full-time master’s in counselling program, and is currently adjunct faculty in counselling at Adler University. His research interest is the process of becoming fully human in an increasingly difficult and challenging world and sees this focus as central to both psychotherapy and education. He has authored academic books, journal articles, and book chapters, and he has presented regularly at local, national, and international academic conferences. He has authored the book Becoming Fully Human within Educational Environments (2015), and is lead author of the books Speaking of Learning: Recollections, Revelations and Realizations (2014) and Speaking of Teaching: Inclinations, Inspirations, Innerworkings (2012). He was recipient of 2015 Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia—Education’s 100—Year of Alumni. Certificate of Outstanding Contribution, 2007-2008 British Columbia Association of Clinical Counsellors President’s Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Discipline of Counselling, 2008 Professional Article Award of the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association for an article co-authored with Dr. Heesoon Bai, “Suffering Loves and Needs Company: Daoist and Zen Perspectives on the Counsellor as Companion.” His philosophical interests and research are based in and from Zen and Daoism. A number of his co-authored articles and book chapters can be found as PDF’s at http://summit.sfu.ca/collection/204.

Yi Chien Jade Ho, Ph.D. Cand., is a teacher, researcher, and Ph.D. candidate in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Her research interest is looking at the cultural roots of social and ecological issues and how education can unearth and address cultural roots through place/land-based pedagogy and ecological education. Her doctoral research includes postcolonial theorizing, place-based education, cross-cultural inquiry into identity formation, love, and education. Her research field work location is Taiwan with teachers who are transforming their way of teaching through place-based outdoor education. Before becoming a graduate student at SFU, Jade was a language teacher in various universities in Chetumal, Mexico. During her time as a teacher in Mexico, Jade coordinated and designed several language programs involving children from the age of nine to university students. Jade has been a community-based researcher at the Environmental School Project, which is a public outdoor elementary school where learning happens entirely outdoors. Jade also teaches various courses including social and educational issues, curriculum theories and implementation, and philosophy of education.

Heesoon Bai, Ph.D., R.C.C., is Professor of Philosophy of Education in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University. She researches and writes in the intersections of ethics, ecological worldviews, contemplative ways, and Asian philosophies. Her co-edited books include: Fields of Green: Restorying Culture, Environment, Education (2009); Speaking of Teaching: Inclinations, Inspirations, and Innerworkings (2012); Speaking of Learning: Recollections, Revelations, and Realizations (2014); Contemplative Learning and Inquiry Across Disciplines (2014); The Intersubjective Turn in Contemplative Education: Shared Approaches for Contemplative Learning & Inquiry Across Disciplines (2017). More recently, she and her colleagues are editing a volume on Ecological Virtues (Regina University Press.) As well, she is a series co-editor of the New Information Age book series: Current Perspectives in Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and Education. Her articles appeared in Journal of Philosophy of Education, Journal of Moral Education, Studies in Philosophy and Education, Cultural Studies of Science Education, Journal of Canadian Philosophy of Education, Journal of Thought, and elsewhere. She is a recipient of Simon Fraser’s University Excellence in Teaching Award, Canadian Society for the Studies in Education Graduate Student Mentorship Award, and Dean of Graduate Studies Supervision Award. Dr. Bai is also a practicing psychotherapist with a registered clinical counsellor (RCC) designation through BC Association of Clinical Counsellors.

Immunity to Change: When Core Meanings Impede Our Best Intentions | Kathy Story, J.D. | 1.5 CEU

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM

Workshop Facilitator: Kathy Story, M.A., J.D., Owner of Story Consulting and Coaching and former co-director of the Leadership Institute in Judicial Education

Track: Coaching

Abstract

This experiential workshop is based on the work of Robert Kegan and Lisa Lahy at Harvard University. We will use their Four Column Exercise to examine our attempts at personal and professional change, including our commitments to change, specific behaviors that get in the way of our commitments, our hidden competing commitments that hold those behaviors in place, and our Big Assumptions (core meanings) that prevent us from achieving the change we seek.  Participants will reveal their own immunity to change system, and develop an action plan for examining and surmounting their Big Assumption. Implications for the Four Column Exercise in therapy and coaching will be explored.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the Immunity to Change model of Kegan and Lahy
  2. Apply the model to their own efforts of bringing about change in their own lives
  3. Develop an action plan to examine their own Big Assumptions or core meanings that prevent them from achieving change
  4. Describe the difference between Adaptive Change and Technical Change
  5. Decide if the Four Column Exercise would be appropriate for their educational, therapy or coaching practices

Biography

Kathy Story, M.A., J.D., is an educator, facilitator, coach, and consultant with over 30 years experience in education, law, and counseling. She works with individuals, professional groups, and organizations to improve practice and satisfaction in their professions. She designs and delivers leadership institutes and faculty development workshops and has been an invited speaker at numerous national conferences. She regularly presents workshops on emotional intelligence, adult education, resilience, and immunity to change.

Kathy began her professional career in student affairs with positions in career counseling and academic advising. After returning to law school, she clerked for a federal appellate court judge, was in private practice as a commercial litigator, and served as legal advisor in student affairs at a major public university. She has taught graduate courses at three institutions, served in administrative capacities at four major universities, provided leadership development programs to health care administrators and corporate executives, and co-directed the Leadership Institute in Judicial Education, a federally-funded professional development program for judges and court administrators.

Kathy has a master’s degree in educational psychology/counseling from the University of Nebraska and a law degree from the University of Memphis. She is a trained facilitator for the University of Pennsylvania Resilience Program, a certified facilitator for the Immunity to Change Exercise developed at Harvard University, and a certified consultant for the EQ in Action Profile. She is also a career coach, and her attorney-coaching program was the first approved for CLE Credit in Tennessee/USA.

Sunday, August 5, 2018

Antoine de Saint-Exupery: The Case of Existential Courage and the Meaning of Life Worth Living | Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D., Dr.Sc. | 1.75 CEU

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 9:45 AM – 11:30 AM

Workshop Facilitator: Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D., Dr.Sc., Head of International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Track: Research

Abstract

The aim of this workshop is learning existential lessons from the heritage of writer and pilot Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1900-1944). He constantly reflected on his life in his writings, the key topics of which were the essence of the humane, happiness, love, and meaning. According to Saint-Exupery, virtue supports the humane in human beings and developing the humane is the core of education. He also saw that human beings must have an inner kernel, which can only be grown through working on oneself. In other words, one can only become fully human when one gives oneself away. Taking this further, happiness is spending oneself on creating something that survives after one’s death, and engagement is the greatest value of all. However, life is a unity of connections, a plexus of field lines. What makes life coherent is meaning, the divine knot holding all things together. In Saint-Exupery’s view, the meaning of things cannot be found, nor hunted, but must be worked out.

Learning Objectives

  1. Revealing the way one’s living is reflected in one’s life philosophy.
  2. Learning how the essence of human beings is emerging, and how this is reflected in contemporary approaches.
  3. Learning the view on meaning as the knot holding things together, and how this is reflected in contemporary approaches.
  4. Learning existentialist ethics as represented in Saint-Exupery’s writings.

Biography

Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D., Dr.Sc., is head of the International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Motivation and Personality at the Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia and professor of psychology at Lomonosov Moscow State University. He strives to integrate the existentialist approach to human personality with the cultural-historical activity theory approach and synergetic views on human self-regulation and self-organization. He is also the author of numerous publications on the psychology of personality and motivation, the theory and history of psychology, and the psychology of art and empirical aesthetics. Both his Ph.D. and habilitation works were focused on the problem of personal meaning. Dmitry is recipient of the Promotional Award of Viktor Frankl Foundation of the city of Vienna (2004) and honorary member of the Society for Logotherapy and Existential Analysis by the Viktor Frankl Institute (Vienna).

Epistemology, Ethics, and Meaning in Unusually Personal Scholarship | Amber Esping, Ph.D. | 1.75 CEU

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 9:45 AM – 11:15 AM

Workshop Facilitator: Amber Esping, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Educational Psychology, Texas Christian University

Track: Research

Abstract

This workshop uses logotherapy as a framework for exploring the ways some professors use unusually personal scholarship to discover meaning in personal adversity. Part I begins with four compelling stories of professors finding meaning: Gillian is a bereaved mother and Ivy League researcher who studied other bereaved parents for her dissertation. Jesse is a transgender man and scholar-activist who educates about the atypically gendered. Ronald Mallett is a theoretical physicist who wants to build a time machine to save his father from a heart attack. Peggy Battin is a bioethicist whose husband chose to have his life end. Using these 10-year longitudinal case studies as a model, Part II will invite workshop participants to explore their own search for meaning in academia. We will also investigate issues of epistemology and ethics in unusually personal research from an existential perspective.

Workshop participants will be asked to bring a copy of their vita as a starting place for discussion. Small group and/or whole group activities (depending on number in attendance) will be used to facilitate exploration of meaning-seeking in the academy. Sample facilitation questions might include:

  • Can you identify ways in which you are using your scholarship to realize creative, experiential, and/or attitudinal values? How do these concepts illuminate the presence or absence of meaning in your work?
  • As a scholar, how are you unique? In what ways have you utilized this uniqueness to advance your scholarship? Could you be doing anything differently to use your uniqueness better?
  • Have you ever felt like there are circumstances in your scholarly life that you are not at liberty to change? How might a logotherapy perspective help you respond to these constraints in way that brings meaning to the situation?
  • Are there any areas of your life that are worth exploring through autoethnography? Would this be viewed as a defensible form of scholarship in your discipline?
  • If you have unusually personal connections to your research, have you disclosed these connections to your dissertation committee or other important stakeholders (colleagues, tenure and promotion committee, etc.)? Why or why not? What are your biggest fears? How might you take steps to avoid these fearful outcomes from coming to fruition? If you cannot avoid them, how could you mitigate them? If you cannot mitigate them, how could you respond to them?
  • How do you weigh the value of personal meaning and professional advancement when choosing a scholarly project? Are these opposites, or do they complement each other?
  • Could you become more productive if you felt like your scholarship was more meaningful? What might this look like? How does focusing on meaning differ from focusing on productivity? How would the outcomes differ?
  • Do you believe that you are directly pursuing happiness, success, or power through your scholarship? Or are you letting these things ensue? Does the difference feel like it would matter in your case?
  • Pull up a copy of your CV. How does translating curriculum vitae to “the course of one’s life” change the way you look at that document?
  • Pretend that today is the day you retire from academia. How will your colleagues remember you after you have gone? What will your field, your department, or your students miss because you are not there? Is there anything you want to change about this now?

Learning Objectives

Workshop attendees will:

  1. Identify specific examples of how they are using—or could be using—their scholarship (research, writing, presenting) to realize Frankl’s creative, experiential, and/or attitudinal values.
  2. Explore aspects of their human uniqueness that can be helpful for choosing or advancing their scholarly agenda.
  3. Articulate the relationships between meaningful scholarship and their own scholarly productivity (or lack thereof!).
  4. Identify barriers that can thwart meaning discovery in the academy (institutional, ethical, epistemological, psychological, sociological).
  5. Create a plan for making their scholarship more meaningful going forward.

Biography

Amber Esping, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, TX, USA. In 2005, she earned an Associate credential from the Viktor Frankl Institute of Logotherapy in Abilene, TX. She is the author of more than two dozen journal articles and book chapters, and three books. Her most recent book is Epistemology, Ethics, and Meaning in Unusually Personal Scholarship (2018). Dr. Esping’s logotherapy research explores the ways in which teachers, faculty, and students use learning and teaching to find meaning in personal adversity. She is discovering that many educators and researchers view themselves as wounded healers, and that learning, teaching, and conducting research can serve logotherapeutic aims.

Dr. Esping also studies the history of human intelligence theory and testing. This scholarship looks at the ways in which psychologists, educators, and others have approached the challenge of defining and measuring human intelligence. Far more than a psychometric puzzle, questions about human intelligence raise many philosophical, ethical, and sociological questions. This writing is usually done with Dr. Jonathan Plucker of Johns Hopkins. The most comprehensive of these publications is Intelligence 101. This book is also available in Korean and Mandarin translations.

Therapeutic Strategies for Promoting Embodied Well-being and Flourishing During the Recovery from Eating Disorders: An Existential-Analytical and Feminist Perspective | Hillary McBride, Ph.D. Cand. and Mihaela Launeanu, Ph.D. | 1.25 CEU

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 11:45 AM – 1:00 PM

Workshop Facilitators: Hillary McBride, M.A., Ph.D. Cand., University of British Columbia; Mihaela Launeanu, Ph.D., Trinity Western University; and Janelle L. Kwee, Psy.D., Trinity Western University.

Track: Therapy

Abstract

This workshop will integrate an existential-analytical perspective (Langle, 2015) and a feminist-relational approach (McBride, 2018) in therapeutic work with women recovering from eating disorders in a way that cultivates embodied well-being and flourishing rather than simply managing or controlling symptoms. This workshop will promote a holistic, existential view on one’s body as a fundamental place of dwelling, connecting with life, and living a meaningful existence. The core existential aspects of embodiment (Launeanu & Kwee, 2018)—together with essential tenets of feminism (McBride)—will be unpacked in practical ways that will allow workshop participants the opportunity to learn and implement therapeutic strategies in working with women recovering from eating disorders. To this end, the workshop will use a mix of demonstrations and experiential exercises accompanied by handouts to engage the audience in learning and practicing the proposed therapeutic strategies.

The first part of the workshop will be devoted to setting the stage by reviewing the main tenets of an existential-feminist approach to living an embodied existence and to understanding eating disorders. This framework will be intentionally connected with the positive psychology emphasis on human flourishing and wellbeing. The benefits of this integrative approach in therapy of eating disorders will be discussed. The construct of embodiment will be explored in relationship to this integrative theoretical framework and its therapeutic relevance in working with women recovering from eating disorders will be addressed.

The second part of the workshop will focus on teaching and demonstrating several practical strategies that could be integrated in the therapeutic work with women recovering from eating disorders to cultivate an existential dwelling in the body and to promote embodied wellbeing and flourishing (Kwee & Launeanu, 2018). Specifically, workshop participants will learn how to facilitate therapeutically dwelling in one’s body, reconnecting with vitality and joy of life through mobilizing body capacities, strengthening one’s body-self, or the wisdom of “I am my body,” and finding meaning through body activities, capacities, and creative possibilities. Workshop facilitators will demonstrate each of these concrete strategies via role play, experiential activities, video demonstrations, and case studies from their own therapeutic practice.

The third part of the workshop will ask participants to engage in practicing the strategies taught before via role playing and experiential exercises. Workshop facilitators will support and provide feedback to participants during these practice opportunities. Small and large group debriefing will be available. The end of the workshop will be reserved for comments, questions and answers from the audience as well as for further dialogue about the presented topic.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

  1. Gain an understanding of existential and feminist theoretical perspectives of embodiment
  2. Learn about the role of embodiment in the treatment of eating disorders
  3. Learn several experiential exercises to promote embodiment in clinical settings
  4. Practice and experience the embodiment exercises
  5. Understand how to integrate embodiment interventions into clinical work and treatment

Biographies

Hillary McBride, M.A., is a registered clinical counsellor in good standing with the British Columbia Association of Clinical Counsellors, and a Ph.D. candidate at the University of British Columbia in the Counselling Psychology program. Hillary has a private practice in Vancouver, where she specializes in working with women and their relationships with their bodies. Hillary recently published her first book with Post Hill Press based on her MA research, entitled Mothers, Daughters, and Body Image: Learning to Love Ourselves as We Are. Hillary has been recognized by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), the American Psychological Association (Section for the Advancement of Women), and the Looking Glass Foundation for her research work in the area of women’s issues, embodiment, and eating disorders. In 2016, she was selected for the Young Investigator Award by the Taylor and Francis Publishing group for her research and academic work published in the Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy as a young researcher. Hillary has extensive history of workshop presentations and public speaking engagements in the area of embodiment and eating disorders. Hillary has presented professional workshops on this topic at the last three Annual Conventions of CPA and has been selected as workshop presenter this year at the International Congress of Applied Psychology in Montreal. More about Hillary’s workshops and speaking engagements.

Mihaela Launeanu, Ph.D., is a registered clinical counsellor in private practice in Vancouver, a core faculty member in the Counselling Psychology Master’s program at Trinity Western University, and a trainer and board member in the Existential Analysis Society of Canada. Trained in Existential Analysis and body-centered psychotherapies, Dr. Launeanu’s clinical and research work is focused on the role of body and embodiment in living a meaningful existence, developing resiliency, and preventing suffering such as that experienced by people living with eating disorders. Dr. Launeanu contributes as a clinical supervisor in the graduate counselling program at Trinity Western University and has presented numerous workshops in the area of existential psychotherapy, embodiment, and eating disorders at national professional conferences and international congresses.

Chess Logotherapy | Roumen Bezergianov, LPC

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 11:45 AM – 1:00 PM

Workshop Facilitator: Roumen Bezergianov, L.P.C., Senior Mental Health Clinician, Arizona State University

Track: Therapy

Abstract

Chess has been with us for thousands of years. With universal appeal, it has stood the test of time, evolved, and retained its relevance to the human condition as that condition has changed across time, clime, and culture. Today it is played almost everywhere in the world, offering an enjoyable way of socialization, competition, and brain exercise.

What can be extracted from chess are not only analytical, logical, and creative skills, but also clarification of values, a personal philosophy of life, and spirituality. The elusive concept of being, covered with mystery and often ignored in a world of action and achievement, seems to come a bit closer in chess to remind us of its primacy as symbolized by the King.

Our King is our life, and the King we strive to capture is the meaning of our life. The other pieces symbolize important values, necessary for authentic living. The Castle is the mythological warrior, symbol for hard work, endurance, persistence, and consistence. The Bishop is a symbol for the expert and the importance of committing ourselves to a career that we are really interested in, to “a freely chosen task,” as Frankl calls it. The Queen symbolizes our greatest talents and passions, which we will never discover until we start committing to our freely chosen task. The Knight is a symbol for courage, creativity, and uniqueness as it is the only piece that can jump over other pieces. The Pawn symbolizes patience, thankfulness (which starts with thankfulness for the small things in life), growth, development, and transformation as it can promote to a stronger piece once it reaches the opposite end of the board.

The empty spaces on the board symbolize potential challenges and opportunities, and the importance of the balance between our external and internal worlds, represented by the two different colors on the board. We have two Bishops, which is an invitation to become experts both in our internal and our external world for optimal and authentic living. The process of the game offers many opportunities for exploring meaning of specific situations we find ourselves in and focus on the meaning of cooperation, teamwork, sacrifice, mistakes, etc.

I envision the workshop as presenting the symbolism of the pieces, the empty spaces and general ideas that can be derived from the process of the game and asking participants to think about what their symbolism might be and share with the group. I would then invite them to participate in an actual chess game and demonstrate my approach directly.

Learning Objectives

  1. Introduce Viktor Frankl’s Logotherapy
  2. Learn how to play chess and discuss Logotherapy ideas in the context of chess symbolism.
  3. Learn how to use chess as a mapping tool for clients to better understand their internal and external challenges and strengths.
  4. Brainstorm other creative ways of using chess in meaning-centered interventions.

Biography

Roumen Bezergianov is a senior mental health clinician at Arizona State University in Tempe, AZ. He is the author of Character Education with Ches” (self-published on Amazon), which has been translated in Bulgarian, Farsi, Slovak, and Turkish. It was published in Slovakia by the Slovak Medical Society in 2016.

Roumen was born in Bulgaria in 1976 and immigrated to the United States at the age of 17. He earned his Master of Counseling degree from Arizona State University in 2006 and has worked as a therapist in various settings: inpatient treatment at the Meadows in Wickenburg, Arizona, outpatient counseling at the St. Luke’s hospital in Phoenix, the mental health unit at the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections, and Maricopa County Juvenile Detention. He has presented in numerous conferences, forums, and publications on the uses of chess as a character building and a therapy tool.

Roumen’s theoretical orientation is humanistic/existentialist and he considers himself a follower of Viktor Frankl. He initially developed his chess Logotherapy method while working with troubled youth at the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections. Because of the positive response of his clients, he decided to write an article about his approach, which grew into a book. Following Roumen’s presentation at the Logotherapy Congress in Vienna in 2014, Dr. Pavel Kotoucek started advocating chess Logotherapy for myeloma patients to reorient them to the meaning of their lives and to prepare them for the important decision-making process related to their treatment options.

Friday, August 3, 2018

Work and Meaning I

Friday, August 3, 2018

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Eileen Dowse, Ph.D.* | Facilitating Partnerships

Successful results occur when you develop interpersonal relationships to inspire commitment; create transparent contracts to form collaborative partnerships; and lead effective meetings to improve strategic operations. During this conversation, you will be introduced to the essential components for becoming a competent facilitator who can establish supportive environments; generate valuable dialogue; and build upon the talents and efforts of group members. You will learn approaches for facilitating open dialogue and establishing trust resulting in productive group work environments.

Learning Objectives

Participants will learn:

  1. Certified Master Facilitator Competencies
  2. Collaborative problem solving and information gathering techniques for partnership development
  3. Tips for guiding groups towards consensus and for building accountability
  4. Tactics for keeping groups engaged and discussions on track

Length: 20 mins

Hsiao-Chun Lin | A Cross-cultural Comparison in Positive Leadership: Ideal and Practice

Authors

Hsiao-chun Lin, Associate Professor in Institute of Education, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan

Ta-cheng Hsiao, Associate Professor in Department of Wealth and Taxation Management, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan

 

Ross Rains | Flourishing in the Marketplace Through Meaning-Centered Covenant-Building

Coming soon…

Azize Serap Tuncer | Time Management After Modernity and its Effect on Wellbeing

Coming soon…

Existential Positive Psychology and Second Wave Positive Psychology

Friday, August 3, 2018

3:15 pm – 4:15 pm

Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D.* | Transforming Shame Experiences through Therapeutic Interventions

Coming soon…

Solomon Makola, Ph.D.* | Pimp the Pain: Purpose-Inspired Dialogues

Coming soon…

Tatiana Ginzburg | Principles of Meaning-Making in the Relationship Between a Human Being and The World

Coming soon…

Bozena Sztonyk | The Role of Gratitude and Social Support in Predicting Posttraumatic Growth in Persons with Vision Impairment

Coming soon…

Positive Education

Friday, August 3, 2018

3:15 pm – 4:30 pm

Julia Yang, Ph.D.* | The Psychology of Courage: Striving and Overcoming “In-Spite-Of”

Coming soon…

Mandy Wai-Chan Chan | Fostering Meaning and Purpose in Life Among Chinese Adolescents

Coming soon…

Andrew Chi-Hong Chen | A Curriculum Design and Implementation of Meaning-Centered Positive Education in a University English Class

Coming soon…

Hsiu-Chu Hsu | Exploring Life Education or Positive Education 2.0 in Promoting Global Wellbeing and Peace

Coming soon…

Janny Shu-Chuan Wu | Emotional Perspective Transformation and Well-Being of Senior Learners by Application of an 8-Week Physical-Spiritual Educational Program in Taiwan

Coming soon…

Meaning-Centered Interventions

Friday, August 3, 2018

3:15 pm – 4:30 pm

Carolyn Helps | Contributors to Wellbeing in First-Year University Students Experiencing Thoughts of Suicide: A Thematic Analysis

Coming soon…

Heidi Marie Hjelmeland | Meanings of Suicidal Behavior and Consequences for Suicide Prevention

Coming soon…

Jameson Natwick | Meaning-in-Life and Counseling: Encountering Ambiguous Loss

Coming soon…

Christopher Wurm | Existential Therapy, Narrative Therapy, and Interpersonal Therapy: Looking for Common Ground

Coming soon…

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Existential and Spiritual Coping

Saturday, August 4, 2018

10:45 am – 12:45 pm

Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D.* | A Multilevel Model of Facing Life Adversities

Coming soon…

Zvi Bellin, Ph.D. | Exploring the Relationship between Social Marginalization, Meaning in Life, & Mindfulness: A Mixed Methods Approach

Coming soon…

Eddy Elmer | Loneliness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Individuals: Coping from a Meaning-Centred Perspective

Coming soon…

Sung Joon Jang | Existential and Virtuous Effects of Religiosity on Mental Health and Aggressiveness Among Offenders

Coming soon…

Hillary McBride | Spirituality and the Body: The Role of Spirituality in the Prevention and Treatment of Eating Disorders, Body Dissatisfaction, and Disembodiment

Coming soon…

Jameson Natwick | What We Learn in the Dark: Resilience, Purpose, Flourishing, and the Need for Relationships

Coming soon…

Cody Oaks | Self-Deception as Inner Misrelation: Despair, Faith, and Self-Actualization in Kierkegaard’s 'Sickness unto Death'

Coming soon…

Carmel Proctor, Ph.D. | Unconditional Positive Self-Regard: The Impact of Perceived Parental Conditional Regard

Coming soon…

Galen Roehm | Overcoming Nihilism in the Wake of Trauma: On the Therapeutic Value of Tragic Optimism

Coming soon…

Meaning-Seeking

Saturday, August 4, 2018

10:45 am – 11:45 am

Gordon Carkner, Ph.D.* | Late Modernity, the Challenge of Nihilism, and the Quest for Meaning

Coming soon…

Brian Canning | Development of the Positive and Negative Search for Meaning Scale

Coming soon…

Steven Tsun-Wai Chu | Man’s Successful Search for Meaning: The Moderating Role of Psychological Strengths

Coming soon…

Jennifer Lingbaoan | Observing the Effects of Language Priming on Meaning in Bicultural Individuals

Coming soon…

Positive Aging

Saturday, August 4, 2018

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Alistair Martin-Smith | Life Stories for Seniors: Metacognitive Effects of Reminiscence Therapy

Coming soon…

Satoshi Shimai | Non-Attachment, Gratitude, and Meaning in Life Among Middle-Age to Older Japanese Adults

Coming soon…

Tina Wu | Transforming Healthy Aging Framework into Successful Aging Model with Spirituality and Meaning of Life

Coming soon…

Work and Meaning II

Saturday, August 4, 2018

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

0.3 CCE

Laura Atwood* | An Adlerian Meaning-Focused Approach to Coaching

Coming soon…

Gina Görgens-Ekermans | Does Calling Predict Psychological Well-Being at Work of Geriatric Care Staff?

Coming soon…

Severin Hornung | Finding Meaning in Organizational Scholarship: From Individualism, Competition, and Instrumentality to Individuation, Solidarity, and Emancipation

Coming soon…

Shizuka Modica, Ph.D. | Development and Validation of the Meaning-of-Work Theory for High Performance

Coming soon…

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Happiness and Wellbeing

Sunday, August 5, 2018

9:45 am – 11:00 am

Roger Tweed, Ph.D.* | Bringing Coherence to Positive Psychology: Faith in Humanity (FIH)

Coming soon…

Gustavo Carrero | The Dynamics of Human Happiness: A Mathematical Model

Coming soon…

Kristine Klussman | Self-Connection as a Basis of Meaning and Flourishing

Coming soon…

Arthur Cheuk-Man Li | Homeownership in Hong Kong: Impacts on Existential Well-Being and Mental Health

Coming soon…

David Watson | Well-being, Temporal Orientation and the Dual Nature of Materialism

Coming soon…

Meaning-Making

Sunday, August 5, 2018

11:00 am – 12:30 pm

Seph Fontane Pennock | The Meaning of Meaning: What is it That We’re Really Looking For?

Coming soon…

Piers Worth, Ph.D.* | A Life Story Theory of Creativity: How Childhood and Midlife Experience May Link on the Eudaimonic Journey

Coming soon…

Catherine Bell | Circles of Meaning: A Personal Account of Recovery from Existential Crisis and How it Helped Others

Coming soon…

Shulamith Kreitler | Meaningfulness of Life: Its Nature and Reconstruction

Coming soon…

Shuru Lin | The Recovery Process and the Meaning-making of Life to the Survivors of Murder

Coming soon…

Graham Notar Maclean | Psychedelic Midwives: 5-HT2a Receptor Agonists as Meaning Catalysts at End-of-Life

Coming soon…

Akasha (Peter) Saunders | Waking Up While Black: How A Jamaican Border-Dwelling Bredda Makes Meaning of His Camino De Santiago Pilgrimage

Coming soon…

Kristin Schultz | Clinical Depression and Meaning-Making

Coming soon…

Nick Stauner | Making Meaning of Hurricane Hermine with Supernatural Attributions

Coming soon…

Self-Transcendence and Mature Happiness

Sunday, August 5, 2018

11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.* | Down the Rabbit Hole: Transformative Life Experience as a Glimpse to Potentiality

Coming soon…

Ezgiamn Abraha | Unheard Cry for Meaning in Life or Mere Nihilism? Qualitative Inquiry on Existential Concerns and Well-Being among the Youth of Higher Education Institutions in Ethiopia: The Case of Addis Ababa University

Coming soon…

Kfir Ifrah | Diversity in the Face of Adversity: How Does Co-occurrence of Positive and Negative Experiences Contribute to Physical and Mental Health?

Coming soon…

Student Scholarship Contest Papers

Sunday, August 5, 2018

11:15 am – 12:30 pm

Arthur Braaten | How a History of Negative and Positive Life Events Relate to Eudaimonic, Hedonic, and Extrinsic Pursuits

Coming soon…

David Carreno | Learning to Live through Death

Coming soon…

Paul Lutz | From Moral Identity to Eudaimonic Well-Being: A Pathway of Self-Transcendence and Meaning in Life

Coming soon…

Justin Rogols | Finding Meaning: Existential Counseling Considerations for Cancer Patients

Coming soon…

Serena Wong | Carpe Momentum: Sacred Moments as a Predictor of Wellbeing for Family Caregivers

Coming soon…

Lilian Jans-Beken, Ph.D. | Gratitude’s Place in Second Wave Positive Psychology

Coming soon…

Poster Sessions

Coming soon…