Dr. William BreitbartDr. William S. Breitbart, M.D. is Chairman, The Jimmie C Holland Chair in Psychiatric Oncology, and Chief of the Psychiatry Service, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.  He is the 2009 recipient of the Arthur Sutherland Lifetime Achievement Award for the International Psycho-oncology Society, the 2011 recipient of the Thomas Hackett Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, and the 2013 recipient of the Jimmie Holland Award from the American Psychosocial Oncology Society. Dr Breitbart is a Past President of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, as well as the International Psycho-oncology Society. Dr. Breitbart’s research efforts have focused on psychiatric aspects of cancer and palliative care. He has had continuous NIH RO1 funding of investigator initiated research since 1989. His most recent efforts have focused on Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for cancer patients. He has over 400 peer review publications, chapters and review papers. Dr. Breitbart has edited/written 10 textbooks including: Psycho-oncology – 1st , 2nd and 3rd Editions; and treatment manuals on Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy in Advanced Cancer Patients, and Individual Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Advanced Cancer Patients. Dr. Breitbart is Editor-in-Chief, of Cambridge University Press’ international palliative care journal entitled Palliative & Supportive Care.

Dr. Breitbart will be giving the following keynote lecture and pre-conference workshop, as well as participating in the panel on Working with Meaning in Life Issues for the 9th Biennial International Meaning Conference, July 28-31, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.


Keynote Title

Meaning and Existential Issues in End of Life Care: Meaning Centered Psychotherapy

Scheduled for Friday, July 29, 11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Click here to download the PowerPoint.

Abstract

This plenary lecture provides an overview of existential issues in end of life care, with an emphasis of the important role of “meaning”. A novel counseling intervention for patients with advanced cancer, entitled “Meaning Centered Psychotherapy (MCP).” will be described.  The basic concepts of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy will be described.  Two forms of MCP have been developed:  Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy Meaning Centered Psychotherapy. A detailed description of the interventions and the content of each session will be provided.  Both interventions are manualized and several randomized controlled trials have been conducted.  The results of these studies will be presented which demonstrate that MCP enhances spiritual well being and meaning, improves quality of life, decreases depression, anxiety, hopelessness and desire for hastened death. In addition, adaptations of Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for bereavement, cancer survivors, cancer caregivers, and adolescents with cancer will be described.

Learning Objectives

  1. The attendees will become familiar with the concept of spirituality as a construct composed of faith and/or meaning.
  2. The attendees will become familiar with the importance of meaning, as a component of spiritual well-being, and its relationship to depression, hopelessness and desire for death
  3. The attendees will become familiar with a structured, didactic and experiential 8 session intervention for advanced cancer patients aimed at sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning in the face of terminal illness.

Pre-Conference Workshop Title

Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for Advanced Cancer Patients

Scheduled for Thursday, July 28, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM

Click here to download the PowerPoint.

Abstract

This half-day experiential workshop provides an overview of a novel counseling intervention for patients with advanced cancer, entitled “Meaning Centered Psychotherapy”.  Participants will be introduced to the topics of meaning and spirituality as they relate to cancer care and the experience of patients with cancer. The basic concepts of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy will then be described.  Meaning Centered Psychotherapy is based on the concepts of meaning as derived from the work of Viktor Frankl, M.D. and adapted for use in cancer populations by our team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.  Two forms of Meaning Centered Psychotherapy have been developed:  Meaning Centered Group Psychotherapy (8 weekly 1 ½ hour sessions; Individual Meaning Centered Psychotherapy (7 weekly 1 hour sessions).  Both interventions are manualized and randomized controlled trials have been conducted demonstrating clinical efficacy. Data from these studies will be presented as well. During the workshop participants will have the opportunity to participate in experiential exercises utilized in Meaning Centered Psychotherapy.  In addition, a detailed description of the intervention and the content of each session will be provided. Newer adaptations of Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy for breast cancer survivors, Caregivers, bereavement, and cultural adaptations of MCP will also be described.

Learning Objectives

  1. The attendees will become familiar with the concept of spirituality as a construct composed of faith and/or meaning.
  2. The attendees will become familiar with the importance of meaning, as a component of spiritual well-being, and its relationship to depression, hopelessness and desire for death
  3. The attendees will become familiar with a structured, didactic and experiential 8 session intervention for advanced cancer patients aimed at sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning in the face of terminal illness.
  4. The attendees will participate in experiential exercises that are components of 4 of the sessions in Meaning Centered Psychotherapy

Interested in learning more about pre-conference workshops? Find out more here.


Panel Title

Working with Meaning in Life Issues

Scheduled for Friday, July 29, 4:15 PM – 6:15 PM

Moderator

Panelists