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Keynote Speakers

Carol D. Ryff, Ph.D.

Hilldale Professor of Psychology and Director of the Institute on Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Carol D. Ryff, Ph.D. is Director of the Institute on Aging and Hilldale Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research centers on the study of psychological well-being, an area in which she has developed multidimensional assessment scales that have been translated to more than 30 different languages and are used in research across diverse scientific fields. More than 750 publications have been generated using her scales of well-being. Investigations by Dr. Ryff and colleagues have addressed how psychological well-being varies by age, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnic/minority status, and cultural context as well as by the experiences, challenges, and transitions individuals confront as they age. Whether psychological well-being is protective of good physical health is also a major interest, with ongoing longitudinal investigations linking positive psychosocial factors to a wide array of biomarkers (neuroendocrine, immune, cardiovascular) as well as to neural circuitry. A guiding theme in much of this inquiry is human resilience—i.e., how some individuals are able to maintain or regain their well-being in the face of significant life challenges and what neurobiology underlies this capacity.

Dr. Ryff has generated over 200 publications in the areas described above, and she currently directs the MIDUS (Midlife in the U.S.) longitudinal study, which is based on a large national sample of Americans, including twins. Funded by the National Institute on Aging, MIDUS has become a major forum for studying health and aging as an integrated biopsychosocial process. She is also Principal Investigator of MIDJA (Midlife in Japan), a parallel to the MIDUS investigation, for which she received an NIH Merit Award.

Keynote | Forces Against and For Eudaimonic Well-Being

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 2:00 PM – 2:50 PM (1.0 CEU)

Eudaimonic well-being gives emphasis to the realization of personal talents and capacities as well as to existential challenges of finding meaning in sometimes difficult life circumstances. Prior research has linked eudaimonia to work and family life, adult development, and health. This presentation will focus on greed among privileged elites as a contemporary force that is undermining the eudaimonic well-being of many. Philosophical/historical and current empirical perspectives on greed will be examined with emphasis on new questions that need to be studied regarding growing problems of inequality throughout the world and especially in the U.S. This dystopian situation will be contrasted with alternative forces from the arts and humanities (broadly defined) that nourish eudaimonic well-being. Examples from research and practice that illustrate heightened interest in how the arts and humanities enhance well-being will be examined. The overarching objective will be to stimulate new initiatives on these insufficiently understood forces that compromise as well as promote eudaimonic well-being for all segments of society.

Learning Objectives

  1. Briefly recapitulate theoretical and empirical perspectives on eudaimonic well-being (EWB)
  2. Briefly summarize prior work linking EWB to work and family life, adult development, and health
  3. Link EWB to the problem of growing inequality around the world; focus specifically on greed at the top as a force that is undermining the self-realization and becoming of many in contemporary societies; review philosophical/historical perspectives on greed and link them to contemporary empirical research (e.g. linking higher social class standing to increased entitlement, narcissism, and more unethical behavior)
  4. Link EWB to encounters with the arts and humanities; summarize current research and practice that illustrate these ideas
  5. Recap these perspectives on forces against and for EWB with emphasis on needed next steps to investigate these guiding propositions

Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Workshop | Unpacking Educational Experience to Better Understand its Role in Lifelong Well-Being

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM (1.0 CEU)

Extensive prior empirical research documents that people with higher educational attainment have higher well-being, better health, and live longer. Despite these ubiquitous findings, little is known about how educational attainment matters for these outcomes. What is it that the educational experience provides? Does the kind of education one obtains (e.g., field of study, such as liberal arts training versus science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) training) matter? As people move across the decades of adult life, what reflections do they have about what their educational training did/did not contribute to living a full and virtuous life? Among those who did not have opportunities for formal higher education, what self-education practices might have mattered for their well-being? The aim of the workshop will be, via these questions, to stimulate reflection and discussion that reach toward the larger objective of promoting research and practice to better understand how education matters for human well-being.

Learning Objectives

  1. Briefly review evidence showing that high educational standing matters for key life outcomes (well-being, health, length of life)
  2. Engage workshop participants in discussion of what components of formal education (degrees, majors) might matter for lifelong well-being and how
  3. Engage workshop participants in retrospective evaluations regarding their own past educational experiences (teachers, courses, readings) that have mattered for their own well-being and why
  4. Facilitate group discussion about how to promote, in research and practice, a deeper understanding of the nexus between education and well-being

Length: 1 hour

Summit on PP 2.0: Mature Happiness

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Carol Ryff, Ph.D.
  2. Michael Steger, Ph.D.
  3. Kennon Sheldon, Ph.D.
  4. Philip Watkins, Ph.D.
  5. Tim Lomas, Ph.D.
  6. Roger Tweed, Ph.D.
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Moderator

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Abstract

From the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0), research on wellbeing needs to acknowledge that (a) human experiences always exists in polarity and involve a dialectical process; (b) there is a dark side to human nature and life is full of evil and suffering; and (c) a theory of global wellbeing needs to be based on the indigenous conceptions of happiness in different languages and cultures. Mature happiness refers to the kind of happiness that involves any or all of the above three basic tenets of PP 2.0. This summit will examine how these new considerations will impact both research and theorizing of happiness and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how happiness and sadness are two sides of the same coin, and one cannot truly understand happiness without sadness
  2. Learn that one’s experience of happiness and wellbeing is influenced by one’s language and culture
  3. Learn that happiness across cultures can be measured by different dimensions
  4. Learn the differences between different conceptions of happiness and wellbeing

Length: 2 hours

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Michael F. Steger, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology and Director of the Laboratory for the Study of Meaning and Quality of Life at Colorado State University

Michael F. Steger, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychology and Founding Director of the Center for Meaning and Purpose at Colorado State University. He earned his doctorate in Counseling Psychology and Personality Psychology from the University of Minnesota in 2005. For more than 15 years, he has researched how people flourish through building meaning and purpose in their lives and work. He has published more than 100 scholarly journal articles and book chapters, and three books, including The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of the Psychology of Positivity, Strengths-Based Approaches at Work, and Purpose and Meaning in the Workplace. He provides keynotes, lectures, workshops, and consulting around the world on the topics of meaning, purpose, psychological strengths, meaningful work, and creating a happy workplace.

Keynote | Is Meaning the Same Wherever You Look? Exploring Meaning in Life, Work, Parenthood, and other Life Domains

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM (1.0 CEU)

If an interest in meaning and persistent questions about the essential nature of existence have been with humans for centuries, the taxonomy and measurement of meaning is a very recent phenomenon. While advances have been made in understanding the causes, correlates, and consequences of meaning in life overall, other offshoots of inquiry have focused on lower-order instances of meaning. For example, meaning in work has become established through conference themes and dedicated handbooks, and some research is starting to explore how the physical environment itself may provide a dimension of meaning. This talk compares leading theoretical models of meaning as applied to life in general and work, and suggests applications to other domains as well. The conclusion proposes some heuristics for charting meaning as a phenomenon in domains that have yet to be explored formally.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify the most common domains of meaning studied
  2. Define meaning in life and meaning in work
  3. Recognize the core set of empirical findings on meaning in life and in work
  4. Critique heuristics for theorizing about meaning in diverse life domains

Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Pre-Conference Workshop | Meaning and the Appointment in Samarra (with Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.)

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM (3.0 CEU)

“The meaning of human existence is based upon its irreversible quality. An individual’s responsibility in life must therefore be understood in terms of temporality and singularity.” — Viktor Frankl

The existentialist Albert Camus remarked that the central problem of philosophy was composing a reason any of us should want to resist death and remain alive. In this somewhat bleak worldview, the permanence, irreversibility, and inevitability of death may render our human lives pointless and moot. But it isn’t the concept of death that scares us as much as the notion that we might reach the end of our life and then realize that we haven’t truly lived. Meaning often has been positioned as an antidote for our fears of death and annihilation. The popular scholarly subfield of Terror Management Theory argues that meaning can insulate us from this “existential terror,” and P. T. P. Wong, logotherapy, and others have promoted a healthy acceptance of death to be central to flourishing. This workshop explores what research shows about the relations among meaning, attitudes toward death, and flourishing. Further, this workshop invites attendees to engage in experiential explorations of how meaning awareness may both benefit from meaning and support it.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand how death has been discussed in psychology and meaning studies
  2. Learn empirical findings regarding relations among death attitudes, meaning, and flourishing
  3. Practice experiential activities designed to create insight regarding death attitudes and to utilize death as a potential source of meaning
  4. Explore the idea of “tragic optimism” to illuminate the art of living, through Frankl’s three pathways to meaning (experiential, creative, and attitudinal)
  5. Share personal views on death in a supportive environment to facilitate self-discovery and meaning-seeking

Length: 3 hours

Summit on PP 2.0: Mature Happiness

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Carol Ryff, Ph.D.
  2. Michael Steger, Ph.D.
  3. Kennon Sheldon, Ph.D.
  4. Philip Watkins, Ph.D.
  5. Tim Lomas, Ph.D.
  6. Roger Tweed, Ph.D.
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Moderator

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Abstract

From the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0), research on wellbeing needs to acknowledge that (a) human experiences always exists in polarity and involve a dialectical process; (b) there is a dark side to human nature and life is full of evil and suffering; and (c) a theory of global wellbeing needs to be based on the indigenous conceptions of happiness in different languages and cultures. Mature happiness refers to the kind of happiness that involves any or all of the above three basic tenets of PP 2.0. This summit will examine how these new considerations will impact both research and theorizing of happiness and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how happiness and sadness are two sides of the same coin, and one cannot truly understand happiness without sadness
  2. Learn that one’s experience of happiness and wellbeing is influenced by one’s language and culture
  3. Learn that happiness across cultures can be measured by different dimensions
  4. Learn the differences between different conceptions of happiness and wellbeing

Length: 2 hours

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Ken Sheldon, Ph.D.

Curator’s Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Director of the Sheldon Motivation Laboratory at the University of Missouri

Kennon Sheldon, Ph.D. is a professor of Psychological Sciences at the University of Missouri. He received his B.Sc. in psychology from Duke University in 1981 and his Ph.D. in social/personality psychology from the University of California, Davis in 1992. He is known for his research on well-being, motivation, and goals. His prominent research questions include “Can happiness go up, and then stay up?”, “Can people be helped to pick life-goals that better express their developmental potentials?” and “How can the concept of personal agency be reconciled with the concept of a deterministic universe?” He is the prolific author of more than 200 academic articles and book chapters. He is also the author of Optimal Human Being: An Integrated Multi-level Perspective, and Self-determination Theory in the Clinic: Motivating Physical and Mental Health, and he has written and edited several other academic books such as Stability of Happiness: Theories and Evidence on Whether Happiness Can Change. He has been the recipient of several prestigious prizes and awards in psychology, and was named one of the 20 most cited social psychologists in 2010 (controlling for career stage; Nozek et al., PSPB).

Keynote | Understanding Optimal Functioning: The Eudaimonic Activity Model

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM (1.0 CEU)

How can researchers identify the “best” ways to live and the most adaptive characteristics to have? To decide, we need criterion variables that are relatively content- and value-free. My Eudaimonic Activity Model (EAM; Sheldon, 2013, 2014, 2017) assumes that subjective well-being (SWB) provides such a criterion. SWB is an “honest signal” of high-quality functioning—a healthy glow that is not easily faked. As such, SWB can help researchers test and compare different theories and prescriptions for optimal functioning. To demonstrate its suitability for this role, I present research showing that SWB only results from eudaimonic (moral, virtuous, prosocial) functioning, and not from hedonic (immature, self-centered, pleasure-focused) functioning. I will also show that programs or prescriptions that focus directly on enhancing SWB tend to fail, just as eudaimonic theorists would expect; SWB is a symptom, not a goal, and can only be approached in a sidelong way. The EAM can easily be generalized to include context variables that affect SWB (such as illness or privation), while also testing personological buffers against negative context effects (such as courage or meaning-making).

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the distinction between the conative, emotional, and cognitive faculties of mind
  2. Be able to explain why cognative processes may be the most logical point of focus for researchers trying to understand “the good/meaningful life”
  3. See why emotional well-being may provide an “honest signal” of healthy functioning, and thus may serve as a relatively unbiased criterion variable for testing and comparing theories of optimal living
  4. Become familiar with the SWB research data that already supports the Eudaimonic Activity Model, noting that these data merely confirm what most eudaimonia researchers already suppose about the nature of virtuous living
  5. Decide for yourself whether agreeing on a basic (but not exclusive) measure of well-being could solve problems for the field

 Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Pre-Conference Workshop | A Workshop on Contemporary Self-Determination Theory

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM (3.0 CEU)

Self-determination theory (SDT) is a theory of healthy motivation, based on an organismic/ dialectical perspective, which has received nearly 50 years of empirical testing and development. I will explain SDT’s “cognitive evaluation,” “organismic integration,” and “basic psychological need” mini-theories, showing their relevance for understanding human thriving, in all of its forms. As an exercise, attendees will get to evaluate their own motivation for attending the workshop and conference! I expect that attendees will intuitively recognize and agree with the basic themes and will benefit from the conceptual and terminological framework provided.

Learning Objectives

  1. Become familiar with the 50-year history of Deci and Ryan’s self-determination theory (SDT)
  2. Understand the organismic meta-theoretical assumptions underlying SDT as a whole
  3. Understand the three most essential mini-theories within SDT: cognitive evaluation theory, basic needs theory, and organismic integration theory
  4. In these terms, consider your own workshop and conference motivation
  5. In these terms, consider your own style for trying to motivate clients or other subordinates such as children or employees

Length: 3 hours

Summit on PP 2.0: Mature Happiness

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Carol Ryff, Ph.D.
  2. Michael Steger, Ph.D.
  3. Kennon Sheldon, Ph.D.
  4. Philip Watkins, Ph.D.
  5. Tim Lomas, Ph.D.
  6. Roger Tweed, Ph.D.
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Moderator

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Abstract

From the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0), research on wellbeing needs to acknowledge that (a) human experiences always exists in polarity and involve a dialectical process; (b) there is a dark side to human nature and life is full of evil and suffering; and (c) a theory of global wellbeing needs to be based on the indigenous conceptions of happiness in different languages and cultures. Mature happiness refers to the kind of happiness that involves any or all of the above three basic tenets of PP 2.0. This summit will examine how these new considerations will impact both research and theorizing of happiness and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how happiness and sadness are two sides of the same coin, and one cannot truly understand happiness without sadness
  2. Learn that one’s experience of happiness and wellbeing is influenced by one’s language and culture
  3. Learn that happiness across cultures can be measured by different dimensions
  4. Learn the differences between different conceptions of happiness and wellbeing

Length: 2 hours

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Phil Watkins, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology at Eastern Washington University and researcher and author of gratitude and well-being

Phil Watkins, Ph.D. received his B.S. in psychology from the University of Oregon and his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Louisiana State University. Currently, he is Professor of Psychology at Eastern Washington University. Gratitude has been the focus of his research since 2000. Dr. Watkins is the author of two books—Gratitude and the Good Life and Positive Psychology 101—and has authored a number of research articles on gratitude. He has served as an associate editor of The Journal of Positive Psychology, and is currently on their editorial board. His research now investigates questions related to how gratitude enhances well-being, the nature of gratitude toward God, the relationship between gratitude and joy, and the factors that enhance or inhibit gratitude.

Keynote | Gratitude and the Good Life: How Gratitude Contributes to a Meaningful Life

Sunday, August 4, 2018, 2:00 PM – 2:50 PM (1.0 CEU)

The purpose of this talk is to show how gratitude is important to a good and meaningful life. After a brief explanation of the definition of gratitude, I present current research showing that gratitude is important to well-being. How does gratitude contribute to the good life? I propose that gratitude enhances human flourishing in that it psychologically amplifies the good in one’s life. Gratitude amplifies the good in both our experience of the past and the present, and also amplifies the good in our social life. One way that gratitude amplifies the good is by amplifying the meaningfulness of events in our lives. In this way, gratitude may support a meaningful life. Because gratitude is one of the most important contributors to well-being, it is important to understand who might benefit most from gratitude. The research offers some surprising suggestions here, but can probably be summed up in this way: Those who need gratitude most benefit most from gratitude interventions. Often, however, those who most need gratitude do not see this need in their life. I conclude by attempting to offer a balanced perspective on gratitude: Although gratitude is not an easy path to happiness, nonetheless, it is a journey well worth the effort.

Learning Objectives

Those attending this keynote will understand:

  1. The definition of gratitude
  2. How gratitude is important to well-being
  3. How gratitude amplifies the good in one’s life
  4. How gratitude might be important to a meaningful life
  5. Who benefits most from gratitude, and why

Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Pre-Conference Workshop | Exploring How Gratitude Promotes Human Flourishing and Meaning

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM (3.0 CEU)

The purpose of this workshop is to present current research on the relationship between gratitude and well-being, as well as describe gratitude interventions that may be used to enhance human flourishing. Of first importance is an understanding of the definition of gratitude, and I portray an understanding of gratitude at both the state and trait levels of analysis. Second, I present a balanced perspective on current research regarding the relationship between gratitude and well-being. This discussion will include an explanation of my amplification theory of gratitude. Implicit in this theory is an understanding of the psychological processes of appreciation, and I explore ways that we can enhance our understanding of this construct. Then, we will turn to discussing evidence-based interventions of experiencing and expressing gratitude, and how individuals and clinicians may use these exercises effectively. Research shows that gratitude is important to the good life; thus, it is important that we understand the psychological processes that inhibit and enhance gratitude. I will present recent research on this issue, with particular emphasis on the relationship between gratitude and joy. Finally, I will attempt to offer some perspective on gratitude, presenting a balanced approach to gratitude and its importance to a good and meaningful life.

Learning Objectives

Participants in this workshop will understand:

  1. The definition of gratitude, at both the state and trait levels of analysis
  2. The status of current research on the relationship between gratitude and well-being
  3. How the amplification theory of gratitude helps us understand the relationship between gratitude and well-being, as well as the importance of understanding psychological processes related to appreciation
  4. How gratitude enhances meaning, and how meaning enhances gratitude
  5. Evidence-based gratitude interventions that enhance well-being
  6. Psychological factors that enhance and inhibit gratitude

Length: 3 hours

Summit on PP 2.0: Mature Happiness

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Carol Ryff, Ph.D.
  2. Michael Steger, Ph.D.
  3. Kennon Sheldon, Ph.D.
  4. Philip Watkins, Ph.D.
  5. Tim Lomas, Ph.D.
  6. Roger Tweed, Ph.D.
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Moderator

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Abstract

From the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0), research on wellbeing needs to acknowledge that (a) human experiences always exists in polarity and involve a dialectical process; (b) there is a dark side to human nature and life is full of evil and suffering; and (c) a theory of global wellbeing needs to be based on the indigenous conceptions of happiness in different languages and cultures. Mature happiness refers to the kind of happiness that involves any or all of the above three basic tenets of PP 2.0. This summit will examine how these new considerations will impact both research and theorizing of happiness and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how happiness and sadness are two sides of the same coin, and one cannot truly understand happiness without sadness
  2. Learn that one’s experience of happiness and wellbeing is influenced by one’s language and culture
  3. Learn that happiness across cultures can be measured by different dimensions
  4. Learn the differences between different conceptions of happiness and wellbeing

Length: 2 hours

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Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D.

Founder of the Society for Existential Analysis and Existential Analysis and Principal of the New School of Psychotherapy and Counselling

Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. is a Philosopher, Counselling Psychologist, and Existential Psychotherapist. She founded the School of Psychotherapy and Counselling at Regent’s University, the Society for Existential Analysis, and the New School of Psychotherapy and Counselling at the Existential Academy in London, of which she continues to be Principal. She was the first chair of the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy and has chaired and directed many other organizations and institutions.

Her application of philosophical ideas to psychology, psychotherapy, counselling, and coaching has been instrumental in establishing the existential paradigm firmly in the UK, elsewhere in Europe, and around the world. She lectures internationally, and her many books have been translated into well over a dozen languages.

She is visiting Professor with Middlesex University and has been a professor with Regent’s College, honorary professor with Sheffield University and Schiller International University, and a visiting fellow of Darwin College, Cambridge.

Amongst her 16 books are the bestsellers Existential Psychotherapy and Counselling in Practice (3rd edition, Sage, 2012), Psychotherapy and the Quest for Happiness (Sage, 2009) and Everyday Mysteries (2nd edition, Routledge, 2010). The second edition of Paradox and Passion in Psychotherapy appeared with Wiley in 2015. Two further books are currently in press and at the editing stage.

Keynote | The Search for Existential Meaning

Friday, August 3, 2018, 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM (1.0 CEU)

Existential ideas can be found in Eastern and Western philosophies dating back many millennia, and these have inspired psychoanalysts and psychotherapists for over a century. In this lecture, Emmy van Deurzen will give a brief historical overview of the roots and evolution of the search for existential meaning, both in philosophy and in existential psychotherapy, and she will introduce some of the practitioners who have developed existential therapeutic methods currently being used around the world.

She will then present the existential-phenomenological school of psychotherapy in greater detail and will particularly focus on her own well-established method of existential therapy and its search for meaning and purpose. This will include a brief reference to her four world’s model of structural existential analysis (SEA), which is based around finding meaning in time and space, as well as her method of the emotional compass to understand the meaning and purpose of our emotions.

Learning Objectives

  1. Grasp some of the philosophical ideas underpinning existential work
  2. Be able to formulate what existential meaning is
  3. Have a basic notion of existential-phenomenological therapy
  4. Attain familiarity with the four worlds model

Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Pre-Conference Workshop | Dream Work in Existential Therapy

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM (3.0 CEU)

This three-hour workshop will start with a brief overview of the existential methods that can be used for finding meaning in dreams. This will include a brief introduction to phenomenology and an overview of existential dream-work. Then, participants will be taught a pragmatic and systematic way of understanding dreams from an existential perspective, and they will work with each other in order to practice these. Finally, the facilitator will work on one of the participants’ dreams in a fish bowl format in front of the whole group to demonstrate the work more specifically.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand how to find existential meaning in dreams
  2. Apply structural existential analysis to dream-work
  3. Attain the capacity to derive meaning with the four worlds model
  4. Have the basic ability to find emotional depth and meaning in dreams

Length: 3 hours

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. (Existential Therapy)
  2. Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D. (Grief Therapy)
  3. Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. (Opioid Addiction)
  4. Julia Yang, Ph.D. (Existential Courage in Therapy)
  5. Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. (Positive Existential Coaching)
  6. Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. (Shame Experiences in Therapy)
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D. (Meaning Therapy)

Moderator

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

Abstract

A summary of the last summit on meaning therapy can be found in an article on five different perspectives of meaning in clinical practice. It is hoped that this year’s summit will lead to a landmark publication on what constitutes existential competency in clinical practice that is both trans-diagnostic and relevant to any therapeutic modality.

This summit will address broad existential issues such as: (1) What is an existential crisis? How can it be an opportunity for healing and personal growth? (2) Why is exploring one’s dark side needed to live life at a deeper spiritual level? (3) Are there different kinds of meaning-seeking with different implications for therapy? (4) What are some types of evidence-based meaning-focused coping? (5) What is ultimate meaning? How is it related to meaning-seeking and meaning-making? (6) How does the process of cultivating inner resources and intrinsic motivation increase one’s sense of meaning? (7) Is it necessary to teach clients to focus both on coping with the present reality and striving towards a future dream? (8) Is it helpful to teach clients to navigate between yin-yang and find the right balance between avoidance and approach? (9) Is the knowledge and skill of cultivating the spiritual values of sacredness and transcendental reality an essential part of existential competency? (10) How can we relate to our clients both as fellow human beings as well as competent and trustworthy mental health professionals?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the breadth and depth of existential competency
  2. Understand the importance of values and beliefs in meaning-seeking and meaning-making
  3. Learn how to relate to clients both as a professional and as a caring human being
  4. Learn how to integrate existential psychology and positive psychology in psychotherapy or coaching

Length: 2 hours

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Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D.

Eminent Professor of Psychology at the University of Memphis and Editor of Death Studies

Robert A. Neimeyer, Ph.D. is Professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Memphis, where he also maintains an active clinical practice. Since completing his doctoral training at the University of Nebraska in 1982, he has published 30 books, including Techniques of Grief Therapy: Creative Practices for Counseling the Bereaved and Grief and the Expressive Arts: Practices for Creating Meaning (both with Routledge), and serves as Editor of the journal Death Studies. The author of nearly 500 articles and book chapters, he is currently working to advance a more adequate theory of grieving as a meaning-making process, both in his published work and through his frequent professional workshops for national and international audiences. The recipient of the MISS Foundation’s Phoenix Award: Rising to the Service of Humanity, Neimeyer served as Chair of the International Work Group for Death, Dying, & Bereavement and President of the Association for Death Education and Counseling. In recognition of his scholarly contributions, he has been granted the Eminent Faculty Award by the University of Memphis, made a Fellow of the Clinical Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association, and given Lifetime Achievement Awards by both the Association for Death Education and Counseling and the International Network on Personal Meaning.

Keynote | Imaginative Retelling: Reconstructing Meaning in Loss

Friday, August 3, 2018, 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM (1.0 CEU)

The literal retelling of the hard reality of a violent death in an atmosphere of compassionate and responsive witnessing represents a core component of a Meaning Reconstruction approach to grief therapy. In this presentation, I discuss the possible role of imaginative retelling as a complementary intervention, in which stories of loss are artistically depicted, metaphorically expressed, therapeutically explored, and often socially shared in written or performed versions. In particular, I will focus on three contexts of this work that mitigate threat and promote the affirmation and reconstruction of meaning. I briefly summarize procedures to support this improvisational, creative activity, and discuss preliminary evidence of its impact.

Learning Objectives

As a result of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Sketch three key components of restorative retelling interventions
  2. Describe the procedures for using virtual dream stories with grieving clients
  3. Discuss the three steps for implementing community retelling using principles of improvisational theatre
  4. Summarize recent and ongoing research documenting the impact of these procedures

Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A 

Pre-Conference Workshop | Grief Therapy and the Reconstruction of Meaning: A Practicum

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM (6.0 CEU)

Major loss, especially of key attachment figures in our lives, can shatter a world of meaning anchored in that relationship, and confront us with a deep sense of meaninglessness and existential loneliness. When such losses occur violently and traumatically, they can further undermine core constructs of predictability, benevolence, and control, greatly complicating, intensifying, and prolonging the emotional anguish into which we are thrown by our bereavement. Over the last dozen years, a great deal of research has confirmed these propositions, and suggested that the reconstruction of a world of meaning that has been challenged by loss should be a central goal in grief therapy.

But exactly how does this process unfold, in the concrete clinical context of real clients suffering real losses? This workshop addresses this question by presenting videos of two single-session therapies in their entirety, offering a close process analysis of each to reveal the therapist’s moment-to-moment reading of each client’s need and readiness to engage in specific meaning reconstruction tasks. Then, bridging from viewing to doing, participants are coached in applying these same skills in a dyadic practicum session with other workshop members. By alternating naturally between concrete experience, reflective observation, abstract conceptualization, and active experimentation, participants complete a full cycle of experiential learning and leave better prepared to practice the nuances of meaning-making in the wake of loss.

Morning Session

Guy: Integrating the Story of a Violent Death

Working with a father bereaved by the drowning of his young adult daughter, Neimeyer carefully negotiates safety for helping him revisit and retell the story of a horrific loss, integrating its painful meanings and images. Learners then practice retelling of difficult losses with coaching from Portland Institute faculty.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

  1. Utilize strategies for negotiating safety in revisiting a tragic loss without re-traumatizing the client
  2. Identify markers of client need and readiness to engage the event story of the loss
  3. Follow principles of bracing, pacing, and facing when using restorative retelling procedures to promote integration of traumatic bereavement

Afternoon Session

Lauren: The Loss of a Young Child

Reviewing with Lauren the residual pain of her young son’s death six years earlier, Neimeyer explores the existential, familial, and emotional impacts of the loss, and helps her review and revise the continuing bond with her child. Portland Institute faculty then coach participants as they practice visualization and transformation of related grief.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

  1. Distinguish between aspects of meaning-making in loss that bear on the event story of the death and the backstory of relationship
  2. Track the evolution of the continuing bond with the deceased and its adaptive role in bereavement
  3. Guide clients in analogical listening to the felt sense of their grief, and its transformation by invoking the presence of the loved one

Length: 6 hours

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. (Existential Therapy)
  2. Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D. (Grief Therapy)
  3. Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. (Opioid Addiction)
  4. Julia Yang, Ph.D. (Existential Courage in Therapy)
  5. Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. (Positive Existential Coaching)
  6. Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. (Shame Experiences in Therapy)
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D. (Meaning Therapy)

Moderator

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

More information coming soon!

Michael Bond, Ph.D.

Emeritus Professor of Chinese University of Hong Kong and Visiting Professor of the Polytechnic University of Hong Kong

To receive the 2018 INPM Lifetime Achievement Award

Michael H. Bond, Ph.D. is the Visiting Chair Professor in the Department of Management and Marketing at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Throughout his 43-year career in Hong Kong, Michael Harris Bond (Ph.D., Stanford, 1970) has strived to present a clear, strong case for the Mainstream to answer through his collaborative research on both indigenous and imported cultural constructs. His current multicultural research and books on social psychology across cultures have introduced Chinese and other cultural logics using an integrated, pan-cultural model for understanding human interpersonal behavior. His ultimate concern is to apply our understanding about cultural differences to improve our working and living across cultural fault-lines in this 21st century.

Keynote | Perceived Satisfaction in Life to Date: For Whom — of What Personality Profile Living in What Type of Nation?

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM (1.0 CEU)

Satisfaction with one’s life to date may be regarded as a cognitive assessment of how well persons have accommodated themselves to the socialization demands in their current life space. Success in this accommodation will depend in part upon the personality resources that each person can bring to bear in the cultural niche into which they were thrown by the fatedness of their birth. We expect that the universally positive personality resources of extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability will be more strongly predictive of life satisfaction depending on the national culture of their socialization, defined in terms of the orthogonal, nation-level dimensions of Self-directedness vs Other-directedness and Civility vs Practicality elicited from the World Values Survey. We expect a greater impact of extroversion and lower impact of agreeableness for persons from Self-directed nations and a greater impact of conscientiousness and emotional stability for persons from Practical nations. Results from this analysis will inform theorizing about adaptive niches and well-being across representative populations around the world.

Learning Objectives

  1. What is the nature of life satisfaction?
  2. How do personality resources relate to a person’s achievement of life satisfaction?
  3. Do certain personality resources show a stronger relationship to life satisfaction in different cultural settings?
  4. How do cultural settings vary in terms of the goals for socializing children?
  5. What are the relationships around the world between persons’ personality resources and their satisfaction with life?

Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Symposium on Life Education

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Details TBC

Bruce Alexander, Ph.D.

Emeritus Professor of Simon Fraser University and researcher in global drug addiction

To receive the 2018 INPM Lifetime Achievement Award

Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. has explored many corners of the addiction field since 1970. He has counselled hard-core heroin addicts from Vancouver’s darkest streets and prisons; conducted psychopharmacological research (the “Rat Park” experiments); collected qualitative information on cocaine use for the World Health Organization; studied the history of thinking about addiction by ancient philosophers and modern scholars; interviewed university students about their amazingly varied addictions; investigated the “temperance mentality” in several countries; and served on the Boards of Directors of NGOs in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside.

Dr. Alexander has published three books, Peaceful Measures: Canada’s Way Out of the War on Drugs (University of Toronto Press, 1990), The Globalization of Addiction: A Study in Poverty of the Spirit (Oxford University Press, 2008), and A History of Psychology in Western Civilization (Cambridge University Press, 2015, co-author Curt Shelton). Although he retired from university teaching as Professor Emeritus in 2005, Dr. Alexander continues to speak frequently in Canada and Europe. He posts many of his recent speeches on his website (www.brucekalexander.com). He was awarded the Sterling Prize for Controversy in 2007.

Keynote | Creating Healing Communities in a Toxic Society

Saturday, August 4, 2018 at the Awards Banquet (0.5 CEU)

Winds of change are buffeting the field of addiction. Both the moralistic view of addiction as wilful evil and the medical view of addiction as disease are being blown apart. A new understanding is emerging to take their place: Addiction is a way that lost people compensate for what is missing or meaningless in their own existences. This new understanding shows the need for drawing addicted people into healing communities of meaning and purpose. However, I fear that the new understanding is still overly focused on addicted individuals, and still underplays the foundational causes of mass addiction in a fragmented world. I will explore the causes of ever-spreading addiction in the modern age historically, and explain why I think healing communities can be improved by enlisting them in the pursuit of fundamental social change. This view was almost unthinkable a half-century ago, but has now been discussed by inspired thinkers as disparate as Vaclav Havel and Pope Francis.

Learning Objectives

Participants will understand:

  1. The historical links between modernity, social fragmentation, and personal dislocation
  2. The link between mass dislocation and an addicted society
  3. The extreme difficulties that a fragmented society creates for a healing community
  4. The recent history of healing communities that both support community members and contribute to the reintegration of a fragmented society
  5. Vaclav Havel’s idea of the revolutionary power of “living within the truth”

Length: 30 mins

Pre-Conference Workshop | Opioid Crisis Workshop: The Meaning of Opioids in a World of Pain

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM (3.0 CEU)

Fifty years ago, heroin had a terrifying, demonic meaning. It was seen as a demon-drug that gave foolish pleasure-seekers a taste of bliss, but left them with a life-long craving for unachievable euphoria. In more recent, neuroscience versions of this old demon story, heroin was said to “flip a switch in the brain.” But five decades of research have undermined this simplistic old story. We now have much more complete stories to explain opioid addiction (Alexander, 2008/2010; Maté, 2008; Wong, 2013).

But what new meaning for heroin and other opioid drugs will emerge from these more complete stories? Can a new meaning slow the still-rising tide of addiction and opioid overdose? This workshop provides a space to examine evidence about heroin at some length, and to compare the range of meanings that it has for workshop participants. We could hope to uncover the most useful meaning for opioid drugs in today’s painfully fragmented society.

Learning Objectives

Participants will understand:

  1. The “old story” of demon possession regarding opioid drugs
  2. The “new stories” of opioid drug addiction as told by Alexander, Maté, Wong, and other recent thinkers
  3. What has blown the old story apart
  4. The meaning of opioid drugs that can be derived from the “new stories”
  5. Ways in which the new meanings of opioid drugs might help to slow the steady spread of addiction and the current overdose crisis

Length: 3 hours

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. (Existential Therapy)
  2. Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D. (Grief Therapy)
  3. Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. (Opioid Addiction)
  4. Julia Yang, Ph.D. (Existential Courage in Therapy)
  5. Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. (Positive Existential Coaching)
  6. Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. (Shame Experiences in Therapy)
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D. (Meaning Therapy)

Moderator

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

Abstract

A summary of the last summit on meaning therapy can be found in an article on five different perspectives of meaning in clinical practice. It is hoped that this year’s summit will lead to a landmark publication on what constitutes existential competency in clinical practice that is both trans-diagnostic and relevant to any therapeutic modality.

This summit will address broad existential issues such as: (1) What is an existential crisis? How can it be an opportunity for healing and personal growth? (2) Why is exploring one’s dark side needed to live life at a deeper spiritual level? (3) Are there different kinds of meaning-seeking with different implications for therapy? (4) What are some types of evidence-based meaning-focused coping? (5) What is ultimate meaning? How is it related to meaning-seeking and meaning-making? (6) How does the process of cultivating inner resources and intrinsic motivation increase one’s sense of meaning? (7) Is it necessary to teach clients to focus both on coping with the present reality and striving towards a future dream? (8) Is it helpful to teach clients to navigate between yin-yang and find the right balance between avoidance and approach? (9) Is the knowledge and skill of cultivating the spiritual values of sacredness and transcendental reality an essential part of existential competency? (10) How can we relate to our clients both as fellow human beings as well as competent and trustworthy mental health professionals?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the breadth and depth of existential competency
  2. Understand the importance of values and beliefs in meaning-seeking and meaning-making
  3. Learn how to relate to clients both as a professional and as a caring human being
  4. Learn how to integrate existential psychology and positive psychology in psychotherapy or coaching

Length: 2 hours

Click here for more…

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

Clinical and Health Psychologist and Philosopher

Joel Vos, Ph.D., is a Clinical and Health Psychologist and Philosopher (NL accredited). He is Director of Meaning Online, a platform where meaning-centered practitioners from different backgrounds receive lectures and training by world-leading experts and where they can offer their paid services to clients anywhere in the world (www.meaningonline.org). Together with other European researchers and therapists, he has been organising IMEC (International Meaning Conferences) in London (www.meaning.org.uk). Dr. Vos lectures and does research at the Metanoia Institute and the New School for Psychotherapy and Counselling in London. His clinical research focuses at developing and evaluating meaning-centered therapies for vulnerable individuals, such as people with a chronic or life-threatening physical disease or in challenging socioeconomic circumstances.

Dr. Vos has published several systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses, including a meta-analysis of 60 clinical trials on meaning-centered therapies (Journal of Palliative and Supportive Care). He published a practitioner-friendly overview of all reviews, with a historical embedding, an in-depth explanation of evidence-based competences, and a treatment manual: Meaning in Life: An Evidence-Based Handbook for Practitioners (Palgrave McMillan). He translated his research also into a public-friendly and artistic self-help book: Fifty Pictures of Living a Meaningful Life (available on Amazon.co.uk). In 2019, he will publish his book The Economics of Meaning in Life: The Rise and Fall of the Capitalist Life Syndrome. He is looking for health services, therapists, and researchers to collaborate, receive clinical training, and participate in clinical trials.

www.joelvos.com / psychvos@yahoo.com / 00447783452423

Keynote | Celebrating the Big Tent of Meaning-Centered Research and Practices: Personal Gratitude and the State of the Field

Friday, August 3, 2018 at the Celebration Banquet (0.5 CEU)

We are often so engaged in the activities of daily life that we may forget what we mean to each other. Birthday celebrations may help us to transcend the haste of daily life, stand still at someone’s meaningfulness, and look towards the future with a refreshed sense of self and connection. We have now such an occasion, as we celebrate the 80th birthday of Paul Wong and the 20th anniversary of the International Network for Personal Meaning (INPM). In this keynote, I will share some aspects of what they mean to me personally, and how they have influenced my own work and the field of meaning-centered research and practices in general.

Firstly, Paul has been advocating the idea of the INPM as a big tent, where everyone is welcome to share and connect, sitting around the fire of meaning in the middle of the tent. This is of utmost importance, as other meaning-centered researchers and practitioners seem to be wandering like nomads in the deserts of cold healthcare systems, companies, and universities who may not recognise the value of meaning-centered research and practices. Furthermore, if we do not want to be a farce as meaning-centered experts, we should not only professionally but also personally engage in meaningful relationships, share experiences without competition, and build together on a meaningful future, for instance in this tent. The INPM tent was initially set up in Canada, but a group of people in the United Kingdom loved this so much, that we have started to extend the tent with some British tent poles and canvases, by organising IMEC (International Meaning Conferences) in London. We may want to brainstorm how we could welcome even more people into our tent, also those who have less time or money to travel to events, for instance via internet platforms of education, connection and practices, such as Meaning Online.

Secondly, Paul is a very prolific writer, who has been theorising about the topic of meaning and who has been crossing boundaries between disciplines and between different “schools.” This is important, as some meaning-centered experts seem to have focused so much on their own tent with closed doors and windows in the past, so that mainstream science and health services have ignored them. As Kuhn showed, scientific revolutions often happen at the fringes of paradigms, particularly when supposedly opposing ideas interact. For example, mainstream researchers have now confirmed the significance of meaning-centered approaches in mental and physical health care and seem to accept the importance of experiencing meaning (“positive psychology”) while embracing existential limitations (“traditional psychology”). These paradigmatic revolutions started by systematically philosophising and rigorously conceptualising the topic of meaning. Therefore, students and researchers may want to study these conceptual foundations.

Thirdly, together with others, Paul and the INPM have shown how empirical research can be conducted about meaning. I have performed over ten systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses, which confirm the positive outcomes of this meaning-centered research. For example, I found significant empirical evidence for core assumptions of meaning-centered practices (clinical and aetiological assumptions), such as the definition of meaning, and multiple ways to experience meaning (material-hedonic, self-oriented, social, larger, and existential-philosophical types of meaning). Over 28 different types of meaning-centered therapeutic approaches have emerged, which use relatively similar competencies. Research has validated the effectiveness of their common assessment, meaning-specific, existential, relational, experiential, and phenomenological skills. Meta-analyses of 60 clinical trials show that meaning-centered practices have large positive effects on the psychological well-being, quality of life, and physical well-being of clients. There is so much evidence that we may want to plan how we can promote meaning-centered practices in national mental healthcare systems, health insurances, and accredited training for practitioners.
Research has shown that feelings of gratitude, connection, and belonging are important sources of meaning. I feel personally very grateful to the INPM and Paul Wong. Let’s meet each other in the big tent and invite others to join our meaningful community.

Learning Objectives

Participants in this lecture will:

  1. Identify the impact that Dr. Paul Wong and the INPM have had on the field of meaning-centered practices and research
  2. Understand the importance of theory and cross-disciplinary research in the field of psychotherapy
  3. Know key findings of research on meaning
  4. Know key findings of research on meaning-centered therapies

Length: 30 mins

Pre-Conference Workshop | Evidence-Based Meaning-Centered Practices: Helping Clients in Evidence-Based Ways to Live a Meaningful Life

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM (3.0 CEU)

The topic of meaning has fascinated people for thousands of years, from old Greek philosophers to the modern cognitive laboratory experimenters. How do people make sense of their world? How do people experience meaning in life? And how can we help others live a meaningful and satisfying life, despite life’s challenges? A plethora of answers have been provided over the years, many of which have been inspiring and helpful, but some have not been so fruitful, are limited, or are even damaging to people. How can we separate the wheat from the chaff?

In this workshop, I will propose an evidence-based approach to meaning-centered practices. The term “evidence” should be read in the broadest sense, with evidence coming from qualitative and quantitative empirical research, experiences from practitioners, and systematic philosophical investigations. Based on 10 systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses of research evidence, I have identified the most effective and meaningful components of meaning-centered practices, and have combined these in a new “common denominator therapy.” In contrast with other practices, not only has the overall effectiveness of this therapy been confirmed, there is also significant empirical evidence for most of the clinical, aetiological, and therapeutic components of this therapy.

This workshop starts with an overview of key evidence-based components: overall structure over all sessions, structure within an average session, systematic exploration of a broad range of meanings, phenomenological skills, and meaning-centered assessment. Subsequently, the participants practice with some of the 39 evidence-based core competencies which can be grouped in five categories: meaning-centered assessment, meaning-specific, relational, existential, phenomenological, and experiential competencies. Participants will practice competencies with each other as clients and therapists. No prior knowledge or specific professional-educational background is required to participate in this workshop.

This workshop will introduce participants to key evidence-based competencies which they may be able to integrate in their own practices. After the workshop, participants may further deepen their knowledge and competences with Meaning in Life: An Evidence-Based Handbook for Practitioners, which details evidence-based competencies and offers a structured treatment manual. They can follow specific training in meaning-centered therapy, counselling, and coaching via Meaning Online Ltd.

Learning Objectives

Participants in this lecture will:                           

  1. Know the most effective components of all meaning-centered practices
  2. Understand which therapeutic competencies are required for meaning-centered practicing
  3. Apply key therapeutic meaning-centered competencies to clients
  4. Identify how they can further develop their theoretical knowledge and practical skills in helping clients to live a meaningful life

Length: 3 hours

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions | Moderator

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. (Existential Therapy)
  2. Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D. (Grief Therapy)
  3. Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. (Opioid Addiction)
  4. Julia Yang, Ph.D. (Existential Courage in Therapy)
  5. Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. (Positive Existential Coaching)
  6. Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. (Shame Experiences in Therapy)
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D. (Meaning Therapy)

Moderator

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

Abstract

A summary of the last summit on meaning therapy can be found in an article on five different perspectives of meaning in clinical practice. It is hoped that this year’s summit will lead to a landmark publication on what constitutes existential competency in clinical practice that is both trans-diagnostic and relevant to any therapeutic modality.

This summit will address broad existential issues such as: (1) What is an existential crisis? How can it be an opportunity for healing and personal growth? (2) Why is exploring one’s dark side needed to live life at a deeper spiritual level? (3) Are there different kinds of meaning-seeking with different implications for therapy? (4) What are some types of evidence-based meaning-focused coping? (5) What is ultimate meaning? How is it related to meaning-seeking and meaning-making? (6) How does the process of cultivating inner resources and intrinsic motivation increase one’s sense of meaning? (7) Is it necessary to teach clients to focus both on coping with the present reality and striving towards a future dream? (8) Is it helpful to teach clients to navigate between yin-yang and find the right balance between avoidance and approach? (9) Is the knowledge and skill of cultivating the spiritual values of sacredness and transcendental reality an essential part of existential competency? (10) How can we relate to our clients both as fellow human beings as well as competent and trustworthy mental health professionals?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the breadth and depth of existential competency
  2. Understand the importance of values and beliefs in meaning-seeking and meaning-making
  3. Learn how to relate to clients both as a professional and as a caring human being
  4. Learn how to integrate existential psychology and positive psychology in psychotherapy or coaching

Length: 2 hours

Click here for more…

Tim Lomas, Ph.D.

Lecturer in Positive Psychology at the University of East London and author of Second Wave Positive Psychology

Tim Lomas, Ph.D. has been a lecturer in positive psychology at the University of East London since April 2013. Tim completed his Ph.D. at the University of Westminster in 2012, where his thesis focused on the impact of meditation on men’s mental health. Since 2013, Dr. Lomas has published numerous papers and books on topics including positive psychology theory, mindfulness, Buddhism, linguistics, and gender. His work has been featured in articles in prominent publications including Scientific American, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Psychologist, and The Times. His current main area of research involves creating a lexicography of untranslatable words relating to wellbeing (please visit www.drtimlomas.com/lexicography for the latest on the project).

Keynote | The Dialectics of Wellbeing

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 3:00 PM – 3:50 PM (1.0 CEU)

Positive psychology has tended to be defined in terms of a concern with “positive” psychological qualities and states. However, critics have highlighted various problems inherent in classifying phenomena as either positive or negative. For instance, positively-valenced qualities can sometimes be detrimental to wellbeing, whereas negatively-valenced processes may at times be conducive to it. As such, a more nuanced “second wave” has been germinating, which explores the philosophical and conceptual complexities of the very idea of the positive. This talk introduces this emergent second wave by examining the ways in which the field is developing a subtler understanding of the dialectical nature of flourishing (i.e., involving a complex and dynamic interplay of positive and negative experiences). The talk does so by problematizing the notions of positive and negative in relation to various emotional processes, thereby reflecting the kind of dialectical thinking that characterises this second wave.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the notion of dialectics
  2. Apply this dialectical understanding to the phenomenon of wellbeing
  3. Critically appraise the dynamics of various emotional states
  4. Appreciate the value of a “second wave” approach

Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Pre-Conference Workshop | The Significance of Ambivalent Emotions

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM (3.0 CEU)

Although wellbeing tends to be associated with positive affect, on closer inspection it also involves emotions that are best characterised as ambivalent. A recent analysis by the presenter—drawing on so-called untranslatable words—identified five main categories of ambivalent emotions that can be seen as connected to wellbeing: hope, longing, pathos, appreciation of imperfection, and sensitivity to mystery. The workshop will explore these five categories through reflective discussions and activities, in which participants will be invited to consider experiences of these emotions in their own lives, and to reflect on their importance in relation to flourishing and fulfilment. The session aims to facilitate a more expansive conception and experience of wellbeing, going beyond an exclusive identification with positively-valenced emotions to incorporate more complex and ambivalent processes.

Learning Objectives

  1. Appreciate the phenomenon of ambivalent emotions
  2. Understand how such emotions are connected to wellbeing
  3. Situate these emotions in the context of one’s own life
  4. Delve into such emotions through reflective discussions and activities

Length: 3 hours

Summit on PP 2.0: Mature Happiness

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Carol Ryff, Ph.D.
  2. Michael Steger, Ph.D.
  3. Kennon Sheldon, Ph.D.
  4. Philip Watkins, Ph.D.
  5. Tim Lomas, Ph.D.
  6. Roger Tweed, Ph.D.
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Moderator

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Abstract

From the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0), research on wellbeing needs to acknowledge that (a) human experiences always exists in polarity and involve a dialectical process; (b) there is a dark side to human nature and life is full of evil and suffering; and (c) a theory of global wellbeing needs to be based on the indigenous conceptions of happiness in different languages and cultures. Mature happiness refers to the kind of happiness that involves any or all of the above three basic tenets of PP 2.0. This summit will examine how these new considerations will impact both research and theorizing of happiness and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how happiness and sadness are two sides of the same coin, and one cannot truly understand happiness without sadness
  2. Learn that one’s experience of happiness and wellbeing is influenced by one’s language and culture
  3. Learn that happiness across cultures can be measured by different dimensions
  4. Learn the differences between different conceptions of happiness and wellbeing

Length: 2 hours

Click here for more…

Jim Rough, M.B.A., M.S.E.E.

Director and Founder of Center for Wise Democracy and developer of Dynamic Facilitation and Wisdom Council Process

Jim Rough, M.B.A., M.S.E.E., is the Director and Founder of the Center for Wise Democracy (www.WiseDemocracy.org) and author of the book, Society’s Breakthrough! Releasing Essential Wisdom and Virtue in All the People (2002). As a business consultant in the early 1980s, Jim developed “Dynamic Facilitation,” a way to help diverse people solve impossible-seeming problems through heartfelt creativity. Now, this process is expanding in many parts of the world. Building on this experience, Jim created the “Wisdom Council Process,” how to facilitate large systems of people, like organizations or nations, to a new level of collective wisdom.

Keynote | Society’s Breakthrough... and You!

Friday, August 3, 2018, 2:00 PM – 2:50 PM (1.0 CEU)

Are you concerned about society’s BIG intractable issues? If someone claimed to have discovered a breakthrough way to solve all these problems, would you be interested? Remember, throughout history, the usual response to such a breakthrough is resistance and dismissal.

Twenty-five years ago, I stumbled upon such an idea and have been bringing it forward ever since. Fortunately, today, it’s becoming clear that our system is breaking down… and causing many of society’s intractable issues, so people are more open now. And recently, governments in Europe have taken up the idea, so we know it can work at the global and national scale. With key understandings, you and I could facilitate this strategy into being, where “all the people” come together as “We the People,” face our BIG problems, and implement win/win solutions. Of course, this would overturn the idea of “Constitutional Democracy.”

Learning Objectives

  1. The current system design for society cannot work into the future.
  2. We need a safe way to facilitate a transformation of our system, so that we all work together in solving today’s impossible-seeming issues.
  3. Society’s Breakthrough (i.e., the “Wisdom Council Process”) provides a way we can facilitate a shift of collective consciousness at the global and national level in the U.S.
  4. Let’s examine our personal reaction to these far-reaching claims and see if whole-system transformation is okay.

Length: 40 mins + 10 mins Q&A

Pre-Conference Workshop | HOLUTION! How You and I Can Facilitate “We the People” to Solve Society’s BIG Impossible-to-Solve Problems

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM (3.0 CEU)

There are many within-system “solutions” to society’s BIG impossible-seeming problems including: educating people, fighting for legislation, raising consciousness, modeling behaviors, etc. But these are blocked because these approaches ignore our system. And the problems are features of our system. We need a “holution”—the kind of “solution” which addresses the underlying system.

Twenty-five years ago, I discovered such a “holution.” And ever since, I’ve been working to bring it forward. Recently, some governments in Europe have taken it up, so we know it works at a large scale. And it could work at the global scale. In simple terms, here’s a way you and I can facilitate all the people to come together, face the BIG problems creatively, figure out win/win solutions, and provide responsible leadership for implementation.

Learning Objectives

  1. Our current system of governance and economics is not sustainable.
  2. The system is causing society’s big intractable problems.
  3. To solve the problems and make our system sustainable, we must facilitate a way for all people to regularly “step back,” face the problems together, and reach unity about what to do.
  4. Using the “Wisdom Council Process” we can facilitate this stepping back at the global level… and at the national level in the U.S.
  5. This is not an option… Our system assumes we are independent, but we are now increasingly interdependent. So, we must all start working together.

Length: 3 hours

Symposium on Meaning-Centered Organizational Development (OD) Practices

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Panelists

  1. Eileen Dowse, Ph.D.
  2. Jim Rough, M.B.A., M.S.E.
  3. Luis Marrero, M.A.
  4. Shizuka Modica, Ph.D.

Moderator

Luis Marrero, M.A.

Length: 1.25 hours

Click here for abstract and more…

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Founder of Meaning Therapy and the International Network on Personal Meaning, and Professor Emeritus of Trent University

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D., C.Psych. is Professor Emeritus of Trent University and Adjunct Professor at Saybrook University. He is a Fellow of the APA and the CPA, and President of the International Network on Personal Meaning and the Meaning-Centered Counselling Institute Inc. Editor of the International Journal of Existential Psychology and Psychotherapy, he has also edited two influential volumes on The Human Quest for Meaning. A prolific writer, he is one of the most cited existential and positive psychologists. The originator of Meaning Therapy and International Meaning Conferences, he has been invited to give keynotes and meaning therapy workshops worldwide. He is the recent recipient of Carl Rogers Award from Div.32 of the APA and a member of a research group on Virtue, Meaning, and Happiness which received a major research grant from the Templeton Foundation.

Keynote | Living with Cancer: A Case for PP 2.0

Saturday, August 4, 2018 at the Awards Banquet (0.5 CEU)

Cancer is a fitting metaphor for the evil and suffering of life, because it even brings pain and death to innocent children and adults who practice a healthy lifestyle. Cancer symbolizes the inherent fragility and brevity of human life—the undeniable universal fact that no matter what we do to protect ourselves, we all can be injured physically and psychologically by toxic and violent people, broken relationships, traumatic events, pathogens, accidents, loss, aging, illness, and death.

Thus, the challenge confronting us is how we can survive, thrive, and be happy under these terrible conditions. I proposed existential positive psychology (EPP; Wong, 2009) and second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0; Wong, 2011) precisely because we need a positive and helpful answer to the tragedy of human existence.

Coping with the most aggressive type of prostate cancer (Gleason Score 9) allows me to experientially validate the key principles of PP 2.0. This presentation explains how these principles can help people live life to the full, even while bearing the agony of struggling under the unbearable existential burden.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the concept of existential positive psychology (EPP) and second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0).
  2. Understand why PP 2.0 is needed for noxious situations and existential crises.
  3. Understand the 12 basic principles of PP 2.0.
  4. Apply the above principles to their own struggles with cancer or other traumas.

Length: 30 mins

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. (Existential Therapy)
  2. Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D. (Grief Therapy)
  3. Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. (Opioid Addiction)
  4. Julia Yang, Ph.D. (Existential Courage in Therapy)
  5. Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. (Positive Existential Coaching)
  6. Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. (Shame Experiences in Therapy)
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D. (Meaning Therapy)

Moderator

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

Abstract

A summary of the last summit on meaning therapy can be found in an article on five different perspectives of meaning in clinical practice. It is hoped that this year’s summit will lead to a landmark publication on what constitutes existential competency in clinical practice that is both trans-diagnostic and relevant to any therapeutic modality.

This summit will address broad existential issues such as: (1) What is an existential crisis? How can it be an opportunity for healing and personal growth? (2) Why is exploring one’s dark side needed to live life at a deeper spiritual level? (3) Are there different kinds of meaning-seeking with different implications for therapy? (4) What are some types of evidence-based meaning-focused coping? (5) What is ultimate meaning? How is it related to meaning-seeking and meaning-making? (6) How does the process of cultivating inner resources and intrinsic motivation increase one’s sense of meaning? (7) Is it necessary to teach clients to focus both on coping with the present reality and striving towards a future dream? (8) Is it helpful to teach clients to navigate between yin-yang and find the right balance between avoidance and approach? (9) Is the knowledge and skill of cultivating the spiritual values of sacredness and transcendental reality an essential part of existential competency? (10) How can we relate to our clients both as fellow human beings as well as competent and trustworthy mental health professionals?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the breadth and depth of existential competency
  2. Understand the importance of values and beliefs in meaning-seeking and meaning-making
  3. Learn how to relate to clients both as a professional and as a caring human being
  4. Learn how to integrate existential psychology and positive psychology in psychotherapy or coaching

Length: 2 hours

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Summit on PP 2.0: Mature Happiness

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 am – 12:45 pm (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Carol Ryff, Ph.D.
  2. Michael Steger, Ph.D.
  3. Ken Sheldon, Ph.D.
  4. Phil Watkins, Ph.D.
  5. Tim Lomas, Ph.D.
  6. Veronika Huta, Ph.D.
  7. Roger Tweed, Ph.D.
  8. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Moderator

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Length: 2 hours

More information coming soon!

Summit on PP 2.0: Meaning in Life

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM (1.5 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Gordon Carkner, Ph.D.
  2. Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D.
  3. Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.
  4. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.
  5. Piers Worth, Ph.D.
  6. Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand.

Moderator

Seph Fontane Pennock

Abstract

For the present Summit, we seek to break new grounds in meaning research from the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0). We will address some of the ignored areas in meaning research, such as (1) How important is one’s worldview? Does it make any difference whether you believe that life has inherent meaning and is worth living despite suffering, or whether you believe that life is inherently meaningless and nihilistic? (2) What is a meaning crisis? Why is it so prevalent? (3) Can we live a meaningful life by being engaged in certain worthy activities according to science, without addressing the dark side of life and the reality of suffering? (4) Can we feel fully alive and meaningful from the painful striving towards a worthy ideal? (5) What are the cultural differences regarding what kind of life is meaningful? (6) Why is self-transcendence (ST) an important area for meaning research?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the importance of worldview in shaping one’s experience of MIL
  2. Understand the dark side of life and chaos as related to existential crisis
  3. Integrate science and religion in providing a fuller account of MIL
  4. Understand the importance of self-transcendence in meaning and purpose

Length: 1.5 hours

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Public Lecture on Decoding Peterson

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Details TBC

Invited Speakers

Veronika Huta, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Ottawa

Student Scholarship Content Adjudicator

Veronika Huta, Ph.D. is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Ottawa. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from McGill University. She conducts research on eudaimonia, hedonia, elevation, and meaning, and works on developing an integrated theoretical model of the eudaimonia-hedonia distinction in the domains of well-being orientations, behaviors, experiences, and functioning. She teaches courses in positive psychology and advanced statistics, and is one of the top-rated instructors in her faculty. She is a co-founder of the Canadian Positive Psychology Association; she co-organized the first cross-disciplinary conference on eudaimonia and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Happiness Studies.

Invited Talk | Transcendence, Awe, Inspiration, and Moral Elevation: Bringing Together the Literatures on Elevating Experiences

During paper session on “Self-Transcendence and Mature Happiness” on Sunday, August 5, 2018, 11:45 AM – 1:00 PM

Researchers have studied several concepts which I believe to be part of a common phenomenon, which might be called “elevating experiences”: moral elevation, transcendence, peak experience, spiritual experience, awe, inspiration, aesthetic chills, and aesthetic experience. Each research area has focused on some aspects of the experience but not others, including: predictors; affective, perceptual, existential, and physical concomitants; and outcomes. I believe that much can be learned by bringing these research areas together. I will review eight empirical studies where I found that the affective experiences characterizing these concepts tend to form a single factor. I will then share insights from a literature review we are performing (Huta & Pearce) on empirical studies of the various concepts, including a tentative definition. Finally, I will share the findings of a mixed-methods study we are running (Huta & Tyrany), with written descriptions and rating scales, to address all of the aspects of these experiences that have been previously studied.

Learning Objectives

  1. State empirical evidence that terms such as moral elevation, transcendence, and peak experience represent a common phenomenon
  2. Describe core features of elevating experiences
  3. Cite some of the predictors, concomitants, and outcomes of elevating experiences

Length: 20 mins

Summit on PP 2.0: Mature Happiness

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 am – 12:45 pm (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Carol Ryff, Ph.D.
  2. Michael Steger, Ph.D.
  3. Ken Sheldon, Ph.D.
  4. Phil Watkins, Ph.D.
  5. Tim Lomas, Ph.D.
  6. Veronika Huta, Ph.D.
  7. Roger Tweed, Ph.D.
  8. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Moderator

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Length: 2 hours

More information coming soon!

Roger Tweed, Ph.D.

Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Student Scholarship Content Adjudicator

Roger Tweed, Ph.D. is a faculty member at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in British Columbia, Canada. He received his PhD in social psychology from the University of British Columbia in 2000. His research has explored the relevance of positive psychology to social problems including youth violence and homelessness.

Invited Talk | Bringing Coherence to Positive Psychology: Faith in Humanity (FIH)

During paper session on “Happiness and Well-Being” on Sunday, August 5, 2018, 9:45 AM – 11:30 AM

Currently, positive psychology is experiencing problems with coherence, and the field could benefit from more organizing concepts to help link disparate findings and researchers within the field. This incoherence can be seen at several levels. First, disunity seems to be emerging between first wave positive psychologists and second wave positive psychologists who criticize the first wave on a number of grounds including failing to explicitly account for the negative aspects of humans and their lives. Even within first wave positive psychology, cracks may be emerging between the practitioners and the researchers and also between positive psychologists focused on happiness and those focused on eudaimonia or virtue. Finally, at a more conceptual level, the field has produced an abundance of important studies clarifying predictors of well-being, but no consistent theory has emerged explaining why these particular factors all predict well-being.

The field could benefit from a theoretical umbrella to help organize and galvanize positive psychology. Faith in humanity (FIH) has potential as a unifying construct. In fact, this construct, though seldom mentioned, already implicitly pervades much of positive psychology, and the field would benefit by explicitly recognizing this fact. Within positive psychology, FIH might be seen as a forgotten sibling whose story is central to the family, but who is mentioned rarely, and then mainly obscurely and obliquely. For these reasons, FIH should be particularly attractive to positive psychologists.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will gain familiarity with the diversity of elements within positive psychology
  2. Participants will recognize the lack of coherence within the discipline of positive psychology
  3. Participants will understand the ways in which “faith in humanity” already permeates many disparate parts of positive psychology
  4. Participants will critically assess the potential for a greater focus on “faith in humanity” to contribute to greater theoretical coherence within the discipline of positive psychology

Length: 20 mins

Summit on PP 2.0: Mature Happiness

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Carol Ryff, Ph.D.
  2. Michael Steger, Ph.D.
  3. Kennon Sheldon, Ph.D.
  4. Philip Watkins, Ph.D.
  5. Tim Lomas, Ph.D.
  6. Roger Tweed, Ph.D.
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Moderator

Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.

Abstract

From the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0), research on wellbeing needs to acknowledge that (a) human experiences always exists in polarity and involve a dialectical process; (b) there is a dark side to human nature and life is full of evil and suffering; and (c) a theory of global wellbeing needs to be based on the indigenous conceptions of happiness in different languages and cultures. Mature happiness refers to the kind of happiness that involves any or all of the above three basic tenets of PP 2.0. This summit will examine how these new considerations will impact both research and theorizing of happiness and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how happiness and sadness are two sides of the same coin, and one cannot truly understand happiness without sadness
  2. Learn that one’s experience of happiness and wellbeing is influenced by one’s language and culture
  3. Learn that happiness across cultures can be measured by different dimensions
  4. Learn the differences between different conceptions of happiness and wellbeing

Length: 2 hours

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Piers Worth, Ph.D.

Reader (Associate Professor) at Bucks New University

Student Scholarship Content Adjudicator

Piers Worth, Ph.D. is a ‘Reader’ (Associate Professor) at Bucks New University. He is a Charted Psychologist and accredited psychotherapist. Piers’ Ph.D. research focused on how creativity changes as we age, and how it may support positive ageing. Piers wrote and launched the University’s MSc Applied Positive Psychology programme which is now in its fourth year. He co-authored the ‘Second Wave Positive Psychology: Embracing the Dark Side of Life’ book that was published in November 2015. Piers is of the view that positive psychology and ‘second wave positive psychology’ perspectives combined with it represent hugely exciting opportunities for teaching and researching psychology.

His research and writing focus at the present time is on subjects and applications that may broaden the base of positive psychology, such as restorative justice, and the training of medical staff specialists in different disciplines. Piers’ teaching is exploring how theories of Carl Rogers support and even amplify some of the affects found in learning positive psychology; and how appreciative inquiry may be taught and used with positive psychology. Prior to this part of his career, Piers worked for over 35 years in industry and blue chip companies, and for 20 years as an organisation development consultant. He was work and project experience in 17 countries.

Invited Talk | A Life Story Theory of Creativity: How Childhood and Midlife Experience May Link on the Eudaimonic Journey

During paper session on “Meaning-Making” on Sunday, August 5, 2018, 9:45 AM – 11:30 AM

This talk will share insights gained from the thematic analysis of a sample of life stories of how childhood experiences point towards the eventual emergence and type of ‘creativity’ in an individual’s life. It suggests a childhood experience may become part of a search for and expression of ‘meaning’ over time. For some, this may be a journey or undertaking in awareness; for others, it is outside awareness, yet still visible within a life story. This is early stage data shared out of interest and part of a case study being developed.

Learning Objectives

Following this talk, participants will understand:

  1. Examples of how an interest or fascination displayed in childhood flow experiences may relate to subsequent adult activity
  2. How this may be positioned within an overall life story
  3. The links of this possibility to theories of eudaimonia or Rogers’ concept of the ‘actualizing tendency’

Length: 20 mins

Poster | Virtues in Positive Psychology: It’s Time to Make the Implicit Explicit

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 4:45 PM – 5:30 PM

Authors: Piers Worth, Ph.D., Bucks New University & Matthew Smith, Ph.D., Bucks New University

Virtues are unquestionably a foundational presence in Positive Psychology, but we argue currently ‘implicit’ in their presence in much of the discipline, and it’s time given their importance to make them ‘explicit’ in theory and practice. A review of literature associated with virtues and positive psychology suggests the discipline often appears to ‘subsume’ virtues into other constructs or frameworks. Their contribution is therefore currently implicit rather than explicit.

This poster seeks to offer:

  • A review of definitions of virtue
  • A proposal for how there are three categories or functions of virtue (which described this way may promote their use)
  • A summary of where virtue material is found in PP
  • A summary of the shortcomings in current use in PP
  • A proposal for how the presence of virtues may be more systematic and of focused use to academics and practitioners such as coaches and psychologists, e.g. Wong’s (2011) PP 2.0 and (2017) Existential Positive Psychology, along with further newly proposed possibilities from the authors

Summit on PP 2.0: Meaning in Life

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM (1.5 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Gordon Carkner, Ph.D.
  2. Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D.
  3. Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.
  4. Piers Worth, Ph.D.
  5. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.
  6. Yukun Zhao, Ph.D.

Moderator

Seph Fontane Pennock

Length: 1.5 hours

More information coming soon!

Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.

Researcher and Lecturer at the Department of Counseling and Human Development at the University of Haifa and Head of the Academic Training Program for Logotherapy at Tel-Aviv University

Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D. is a researcher and lecturer at the department of Counseling and Human Development, University of Haifa. She is a logotherapist (Diplomate Clinician), the head of the academic training program for logotherapy at Tel-Aviv university, and the chairperson of the Logotherapy Association in Israel. She is passionate about building bridges—between disciplines and between theory and “real life” practice, in therapy, organizations, communities, and education throughout the lifespan. She is especially keen about creating a synergistic integration between the fields of positive psychology, spirituality, existential psychology, and logotherapy (meaning-oriented psychotherapy), which she believes allows for a more holistic view of human growth and development than any one of these separately. Her main research and practice interests focus on meaning in life, positive psychology, spirituality and spiritual development, positive change, and growth.

Dr. Russo-Netzer serves as academic advisor and consultant to both academic and non-academic institutions, conducts seminars and workshops, and develops training programs and curricula for various organizations on positive psychology, logotherapy, leadership, meaning in life, resilience and spirituality. She is the co-editor of the books Meaning in Positive and Existential Psychology (Springer, 2014), Clinical Perspectives on Meaning: Positive and Existential Psychotherapy (Springer, 2016) and Search for Meaning in the Israeli scene (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).

Pre-Conference Workshop | Meaning and the Appointment in Samarra (with Michael F. Steger, Ph.D.)

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM (3.0 CEU)

“The meaning of human existence is based upon its irreversible quality. An individual’s responsibility in life must therefore be understood in terms of temporality and singularity.” — Viktor Frankl

The existentialist Albert Camus remarked that the central problem of philosophy was composing a reason any of us should want to resist death and remain alive. In this somewhat bleak worldview, the permanence, irreversibility, and inevitability of death may render our human lives pointless and moot. But it isn’t the concept of death that scares us as much as the notion that we might reach the end of our life and then realize that we haven’t truly lived. Meaning often has been positioned as an antidote for our fears of death and annihilation. The popular scholarly subfield of Terror Management Theory argues that meaning can insulate us from this “existential terror,” and P. T. P. Wong, logotherapy, and others have promoted a healthy acceptance of death to be central to flourishing. This workshop explores what research shows about the relations among meaning, attitudes toward death, and flourishing. Further, this workshop invites attendees to engage in experiential explorations of how meaning awareness may both benefit from meaning and support it.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand how death has been discussed in psychology and meaning studies
  2. Learn empirical findings regarding relations among death attitudes, meaning, and flourishing
  3. Practice experiential activities designed to create insight regarding death attitudes and to utilize death as a potential source of meaning
  4. Explore the idea of “tragic optimism” to illuminate the art of living, through Frankl’s three pathways to meaning (experiential, creative, and attitudinal)
  5. Share personal views on death in a supportive environment to facilitate self-discovery and meaning-seeking

Length: 3 hours

Invited Talk | Down the Rabbit Hole: Transformative Life Experience as a Glimpse to Potentiality

During paper session on “Self-Transcendence and Mature Happiness” on Sunday, August 5, 2018, 11:45 AM – 1:00 PM

Change processes are part and parcel of human nature and are evident in various contexts. One type of such change may be triggered by transformative life experiences (TLE). TLE often involve a radical, profound reorganization or change in one’s life due to applying formative, life-changing choices. The talk will present a phenomenological exploration of such experiences from the first-person perspective that aims to offer a heuristic theoretical view of how such events facilitate the possibility of profound and stable change in life. Data analysis of 120 in-depth interviews was guided by a hermeneutic phenomenology paradigm which postulates that people account for their experiences within four existential domains of temporality, spatiality, corporality, and relationality. Findings suggest that TLE are characterized with “dissolution” of social and psychological context across these four existential domains. This allows for situational freedom to glimpse potentiality which may in turn facilitate change.

Learning Objectives

  1. Introduce the first-person perspectiveas an irreducible source of knowledge on transformative life experiences
  2. Identify key features of transformative life experiences from the first-person perspective that may facilitate profound change in life
  3. Proposeheuristic theoretical framework of the first-person perspective, reflecting continuous and dynamic movement between potentiality and context

Length: 20 mins

Summit on PP 2.0: Meaning in Life

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM (1.5 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Gordon Carkner, Ph.D.
  2. Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D.
  3. Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.
  4. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.
  5. Piers Worth, Ph.D.
  6. Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand.

Moderator

Seph Fontane Pennock

Abstract

For the present Summit, we seek to break new grounds in meaning research from the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0). We will address some of the ignored areas in meaning research, such as (1) How important is one’s worldview? Does it make any difference whether you believe that life has inherent meaning and is worth living despite suffering, or whether you believe that life is inherently meaningless and nihilistic? (2) What is a meaning crisis? Why is it so prevalent? (3) Can we live a meaningful life by being engaged in certain worthy activities according to science, without addressing the dark side of life and the reality of suffering? (4) Can we feel fully alive and meaningful from the painful striving towards a worthy ideal? (5) What are the cultural differences regarding what kind of life is meaningful? (6) Why is self-transcendence (ST) an important area for meaning research?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the importance of worldview in shaping one’s experience of MIL
  2. Understand the dark side of life and chaos as related to existential crisis
  3. Integrate science and religion in providing a fuller account of MIL
  4. Understand the importance of self-transcendence in meaning and purpose

Length: 1.5 hours

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Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D., Dr.Sc.

Head of International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation, National Research University Higher School of Economics

Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D., Dr.Sc., is head of the International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Motivation and Personality at the Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia and professor of psychology at Lomonosov Moscow State University. He strives to integrate the existentialist approach to human personality with the cultural-historical activity theory approach and synergetic views on human self-regulation and self-organization. He is also the author of numerous publications on the psychology of personality and motivation, the theory and history of psychology, and the psychology of art and empirical aesthetics. Both his Ph.D. and habilitation works were focused on the problem of personal meaning. Dmitry is recipient of the Promotional Award of Viktor Frankl Foundation of the city of Vienna (2004) and honorary member of the Society for Logotherapy and Existential Analysis by the Viktor Frankl Institute (Vienna).

Invited Talk | A Multilevel Model of Facing Life Adversities

During paper session on “Existential and Spiritual Coping” on Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:30 PM

Adversities are pressures that enforce change in an individual who is trying to maintain his or her integrity through avoiding change as long as possible. Four lines of defense correspond to four types of psychological resources that can be mobilized as well as four types of responsive processes. The self-regulation paradigm (Skinner) presents a unified theoretical context for all the above. (1) Initial conservation resources, such as optimism, hardiness, happiness, and so on, function as resilience buffers, a power field that “covers” an individual and allows him or her to pass through obstacles without noticing them. (2) If there is a stronger challenge that cannot be ignored, standard adaptive coping skills launch local automated responses. (3) When these responses do not suffice, the growing challenge enforces flexible self-regulated responses involving the whole individual. (4) If self-conservation fails under very strong pressure, a possible outcome may be adversarial growth based on meaning, existential courage, and reflexive self-detachment that allow construing a new “self” rather than conserving the old one.

Learning Objectives

Participants will learn:

  1. The principle of self-regulation underlying all human responses to adversities.
  2. The relationships between central constructs explaining human responses toward adversities.
  3. The transition from defense to change as the main principle of facing adversities.
  4. The concept and classification of personality resources.

Length: 20 mins

Workshop | Antoine de Saint-Exupery: The Case of Existential Courage and the Meaning of Life Worth Living

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 9:45 AM – 11:15 AM (1.5 CEU)

The aim of this workshop is learning existential lessons from the heritage of writer and pilot Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1900-1944). He constantly reflected on his life in his writings, the key topics of which were the essence of the humane, happiness, love, and meaning. According to Saint-Exupery, virtue supports the humane in human beings and developing the humane is the core of education. He also saw that human beings must have an inner kernel, which can only be grown through working on oneself. In other words, one can only become fully human when one gives oneself away. Taking this further, happiness is spending oneself on creating something that survives after one’s death, and engagement is the greatest value of all. However, life is a unity of connections, a plexus of field lines. What makes life coherent is meaning, the divine knot holding all things together. In Saint-Exupery’s view, the meaning of things cannot be found, nor hunted, but must be worked out.

Learning Objectives

  1. Revealing the way one’s living is reflected in one’s life philosophy.
  2. Learning how the essence of human beings is emerging, and how this is reflected in contemporary approaches.
  3. Learning the view on meaning as the knot holding things together, and how this is reflected in contemporary approaches.
  4. Learning existentialist ethics as represented in Saint-Exupery’s writings.

Length: 1 hour

Summit on PP 2.0: Meaning in Life

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM (1.5 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Gordon Carkner, Ph.D.
  2. Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D.
  3. Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.
  4. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.
  5. Piers Worth, Ph.D.
  6. Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand.

Moderator

Seph Fontane Pennock

Abstract

For the present Summit, we seek to break new grounds in meaning research from the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0). We will address some of the ignored areas in meaning research, such as (1) How important is one’s worldview? Does it make any difference whether you believe that life has inherent meaning and is worth living despite suffering, or whether you believe that life is inherently meaningless and nihilistic? (2) What is a meaning crisis? Why is it so prevalent? (3) Can we live a meaningful life by being engaged in certain worthy activities according to science, without addressing the dark side of life and the reality of suffering? (4) Can we feel fully alive and meaningful from the painful striving towards a worthy ideal? (5) What are the cultural differences regarding what kind of life is meaningful? (6) Why is self-transcendence (ST) an important area for meaning research?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the importance of worldview in shaping one’s experience of MIL
  2. Understand the dark side of life and chaos as related to existential crisis
  3. Integrate science and religion in providing a fuller account of MIL
  4. Understand the importance of self-transcendence in meaning and purpose

Length: 1.5 hours

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Julia Yang, Ph.D.

Professor at the National Kaohsiung Normal University

Julia Yang, Ph.D., N.C.C., is a diplomat of the North American Society of Adlerian Psychology and founding president of the Taiwan Society of Adlerian Psychology. She received her doctoral degree in counseling from the Ohio State University. She taught at the Pennsylvania State University at Shippensburg, California State University at Fresno, and Governors State University, University Park, Illinois. She was the founding chair for the counseling department at National Kaohsiung Normal University in Taiwan. She has published journal articles and book chapters in the areas of counseling at-risk youths, spirituality, and cultural and neural science aspects of work and stress. She loves her children and husband who share the value of beauty, education, music, friendship, family, social equality, and God.

Invited Talk | The Psychology of Courage: Striving and Overcoming “In-Spite-Of”

During paper session on “Positive Education” on Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Problems of living today seem worse now than ever as fears dictate our thoughts, feelings, and actions at home, school, and work, and in society. The discussion of courage is hence necessary as we confront the meaning of existence and the challenges of fostering individual wellbeing and creating a better world for all. Courage is intimately related to Nietzsche’s concept of will to power, in which will is a given feature we have at birth and we have the power to affirm our living and the ability to overcome life hurdles as we strive toward actualization. The purpose of this program is to present how existential and humanistic psychology by Frankl and Alder offer the most commensurate framework open to a collaborative understanding of what courage is and how courage and its co-requisite attitudes give us strength to self-affirm in-spite-of the most difficult occurrences in life.

Learning Objectives

Participants of this presentation will learn

  1. The definition of courage in relation to the existential concept of the will to power.
  2. Adversities must be present prior to courage that summons the innate life force of striving and overcoming.
  3. How courage must be accompanied by its co-requisites such as faith, love, wisdom, hope, and joy.
  4. Courage can be operationalized as psychological constructs postulated by Frankl and Adler.
  5. Courage is a spiritual construct universal to differing cultural traditions.

Length: 20 mins

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. (Existential Therapy)
  2. Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D. (Grief Therapy)
  3. Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. (Opioid Addiction)
  4. Julia Yang, Ph.D. (Existential Courage in Therapy)
  5. Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. (Positive Existential Coaching)
  6. Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. (Shame Experiences in Therapy)
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D. (Meaning Therapy)

Moderator

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

Abstract

A summary of the last summit on meaning therapy can be found in an article on five different perspectives of meaning in clinical practice. It is hoped that this year’s summit will lead to a landmark publication on what constitutes existential competency in clinical practice that is both trans-diagnostic and relevant to any therapeutic modality.

This summit will address broad existential issues such as: (1) What is an existential crisis? How can it be an opportunity for healing and personal growth? (2) Why is exploring one’s dark side needed to live life at a deeper spiritual level? (3) Are there different kinds of meaning-seeking with different implications for therapy? (4) What are some types of evidence-based meaning-focused coping? (5) What is ultimate meaning? How is it related to meaning-seeking and meaning-making? (6) How does the process of cultivating inner resources and intrinsic motivation increase one’s sense of meaning? (7) Is it necessary to teach clients to focus both on coping with the present reality and striving towards a future dream? (8) Is it helpful to teach clients to navigate between yin-yang and find the right balance between avoidance and approach? (9) Is the knowledge and skill of cultivating the spiritual values of sacredness and transcendental reality an essential part of existential competency? (10) How can we relate to our clients both as fellow human beings as well as competent and trustworthy mental health professionals?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the breadth and depth of existential competency
  2. Understand the importance of values and beliefs in meaning-seeking and meaning-making
  3. Learn how to relate to clients both as a professional and as a caring human being
  4. Learn how to integrate existential psychology and positive psychology in psychotherapy or coaching

Length: 2 hours

Click here for more…

Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand.

Administrative Director, Positive Psychology Research Center, Tsinghua University

Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand., is a graduate student of Social Psychology at Tsinghua University, focusing in Positive Psychology. His main research interests are positive education, self-determination, meaning and well-being, and big data. He also serves as the Administrative Director of the Positive Psychology Research Center at Tsinghua University, China. In this role, he organizes events like China International Positive Psychology Conferences and Chinese delegations to the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA) World Congresses; develops programs like Positive Education curriculum and Positive Enterprise solutions; and disseminates positive psychology in various sectors and channels. He is IPPA’s Special Representative to China, and co-founded Beijing Positive Psychology Association. He received the Master of Applied Positive Psychology degree from University of Pennsylvania in 2010. He also holds Master’s degrees of Computer Science and Chemistry from Rutgers University. Yukun has published five books in China, and co-edited/co-translated four books.

Summit on PP 2.0: Meaning in Life

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM (1.5 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Gordon Carkner, Ph.D.
  2. Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D.
  3. Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.
  4. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.
  5. Piers Worth, Ph.D.
  6. Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand.

Moderator

Seph Fontane Pennock

Abstract

For the present Summit, we seek to break new grounds in meaning research from the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0). We will address some of the ignored areas in meaning research, such as (1) How important is one’s worldview? Does it make any difference whether you believe that life has inherent meaning and is worth living despite suffering, or whether you believe that life is inherently meaningless and nihilistic? (2) What is a meaning crisis? Why is it so prevalent? (3) Can we live a meaningful life by being engaged in certain worthy activities according to science, without addressing the dark side of life and the reality of suffering? (4) Can we feel fully alive and meaningful from the painful striving towards a worthy ideal? (5) What are the cultural differences regarding what kind of life is meaningful? (6) Why is self-transcendence (ST) an important area for meaning research?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the importance of worldview in shaping one’s experience of MIL
  2. Understand the dark side of life and chaos as related to existential crisis
  3. Integrate science and religion in providing a fuller account of MIL
  4. Understand the importance of self-transcendence in meaning and purpose

Length: 1.5 hours

Click here for more…

Eileen Dowse, Ph.D.

Organizational Psychologist, President of Human Dynamics, and award-winning author of The Naked Manager: How to Build Open Relationships at Work

Eileen Dowse, Ph.D. is an insightful, global leader specializing in helping to create ‘collective impact’ for her clients. As an Organizational Psychologist, Eileen is a thought-leader with extensive practical experience in the field of global leadership and cultural competency development. Eileen is widely regarded as one of the leaders in international facilitation as well as being a co-founder and Chair of the International Institute for Facilitation. Her book, “The Agile Business Leader, The Four Roles of Successful Leaders” (also translated into Chinese) which places emphasis on quality, speed and collaboration.

Pre-Conference Workshop | Using the Lessons of Disruptive Innovation to Move to the Next Level of Change (with Lynne Brisdon, PCC and Vanessa E. Wiebel, PCC, RST, CPCC)

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM (3.0 CEU)

Disruptive innovation, as defined by Clayton Christensen, “describes a process by which a product or service takes root initially in simple applications at the bottom of a market and then relentlessly moves up market, eventually displacing established competitors.”

Today these disruptions are creating new dynamics within teams and impacting organisations, societies, and economies, by creating new megatrends or permanent, long-term changes. This has become an opportunity for leaders to move away from linear thinking systems and processes, towards responding quickly, with resilience and positive disruption. In this new environment, facilitative leaders must build upon the shared knowledge of the organisation and understand the dynamics involved in disruptive innovation. They must encourage best processes for leveraging and harnessing resources for ensuring the team and/or the organization continually stays relevant.

This program provides practical applications for discovering the upside of disruption and emphasizes how, in a world where everything is changing, the biggest risk is standing still.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how to perfect innovation through a thoughtful process and evaluation of new ideas
  2. Understand the benefits of joyful directiveness—can you stop the direction of thinking when you don’t agree?
  3. Examine ways to leverage the knowledge and wisdom of your organisation’s human capital through building collaboration and trust within relationships during innovation
  4. Discover the five traps (and their solutions) when innovating disruptive products and technologies
  5. Explore the power of acknowledgement in communication, motivation, and collaboration

Length: 3 hours

Co-Presenters

Lynne BrisdonLynne Brisdon, PCC is an accomplished Business Coach who blends disciplines of coaching and spirituality to connect people with their essential purpose to find deeper meaning in all aspects their lives, personally and professionally. Her appreciation of mindfulness practices led her to coaching as a practical way to explore thinking processes and behavior patterns through deep listening and powerful questioning. In structured conversations, her clients access new perspectives that are foundational to meaningful and lasting change.

Vanessa WiebelVanessa E. Wiebel, PCC, RST, CPCC is an innovative leader specialized in helping ignite paradigm shifts needed to foster Work Life Balance success. As a Professional Co-active Coach, Vanessa brings multi-disciplinary perspectives and experience in the field of overwhelm recovery using practical holistic applications. She is a National Bestselling Author for her chapter “Courage is Key” in Stand Apart (CelebrityPress, 2013), emphasizing the importance of integral alignment during high conflict, and how to stay able to respond in extreme settings.

Invited Talk | Facilitating Partnerships

During paper session on “Work and Meaning I” on Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Successful results occur when you develop interpersonal relationships to inspire commitment; create transparent contracts to form collaborative partnerships; and lead effective meetings to improve strategic operations. During this conversation, you will be introduced to the essential components for becoming a competent facilitator who can establish supportive environments; generate valuable dialogue; and build upon the talents and efforts of group members. You will learn approaches for facilitating open dialogue and establishing trust resulting in productive group work environments.

Learning Objectives

You will learn:

  1. Certified Master Facilitator Competencies
  2. Collaborative problem solving and information gathering techniques for partnership development
  3. Tips for guiding groups towards consensus and for building accountability
  4. Tactics for keeping groups engaged and discussions on track

Length: 20 mins

Symposium on Meaning-Centered Organizational Development (OD) Practices

Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Panelists

  1. Eileen Dowse, Ph.D.
  2. Jim Rough, M.B.A., M.S.E.
  3. Luis Marrero, M.A.
  4. Shizuka Modica, Ph.D.

Moderator

Luis Marrero, M.A.

Length: 1.25 hours

Click here for abstract and more…

Laura Atwood, PCC, BCC, ACPC

President of Adler Learning USA and professional mediator

Laura R. Atwood, PCC, BCC, ACPC, holds multiple coaching certifications including PCC (Professional Certified Coach) from ICF; BCC (Board Certified Coach) from CCE with specialty certifications in Executive Coaching and Leadership; and ACPC (Adler Certified Professional Coach). She is also a neuroscience-based C-IQ® trained coach; Living Systems Team Coach®; Adlerian Relationship Coach and Parent Coach; and Certified Master Tilt Practitioner for the Tilt suite of assessments.

As President of Adler Learning USA, Laura’s experience includes fifteen years training, certifying, and mentoring professional coaches, and also teaching a “Leader as Coach” program in organizations. Her anthropology background brings an understanding of culture systems in organizations and meaning-making across cultures. She is also a professional mediator, with experience in both civil and family/divorce mediation. She has served as interim President and CEO of Lead for Good, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization specializing in social sector leadership development.

A global leader in the coaching profession, she championed professionalism in coaching as Co-Chair of the Regulatory Committee of ICF (International Coach Federation) and was the 2010-2012 President of ACTO (Association of Coach Training Organizations—a global organization of coach training companies advocating for high standards in coach development). Laura collaborated on a steering committee to convene an invitational global summit on coach development (Charlotte, NC 2012), and was an organizer of the first global forum on the future of coaching (Vancouver 2006). Laura was 2006 President of the Greater Phoenix ICF Chapter.

With a highly intuitive coaching style, and drawing on domains such as psychology, neuroscience, and change theory, Laura works with clients at two levels: both tactical-strategic and transformational-developmental. Coaching Specialties: Executive Coaching, Leadership Coaching, Team Coaching, Conflict and Relationship Coaching, Coaching for Meaning and Fulfillment, Mentor Coaching. Client experience spans construction, healthcare, education, technology, small business owners, manufacturing, government, non-profits, and life coaching sectors.

Invited Talk | An Adlerian Meaning-Focused Approach to Coaching

During paper session on “Work and Meaning II” on Saturday, August 4, 2018, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Alfred Adler, a contemporary and erstwhile colleague of Freud and Jung, was the first great psychologist to focus on meaning as core to his philosophy and approach. Luminaries such as Viktor Frankl, Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and Rollo May acknowledged Adler’s influences, and the fields of positive psychology, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and contemporary parenting theory have deep Adlerian roots. While not as publicly lauded as some of his contemporaries and successors, the heart of Adlerian theory persists, somewhat out of our awareness. Just as we’re rarely conscious of the skin we walk around in, Adlerian principles are also a theoretical “skin” that most of us wear without thinking about it.

Adler has also been nicknamed “The Grandfather of Coaching” because his approach and underlying principles were so closely akin to what we now call coaching. This paper session will explore the many dimensions where Adlerian theory intersects with and provides deep grounding for best practices and meaning-enriched effectiveness in coaching.

Adler’s core principle of Gemeinschaftsgefühl, or “social interest,” gives rise to a core philosophical assumption behind our Adlerian coaching approach, which recognizes coaching as a vehicle for resolving the inherent human dilemma of expressing one’s individual uniqueness, while at the same time operating effectively within a network of social embeddedness. For Adler, meaning was all-important, and he focused on looking at meaning in three key areas of the human experience: work, social connection, and intimate relationships. He pointed to healthy opportunities to connect and contribute as key to meaning and thriving. Coaching can help clients to find their own unique ways to connect and contribute, and thereby to create their own path to meaning.

He also looked at humans as meaning-making and meaning-seeking beings. In his book What Life Could Mean to You (1931), Adler wrote “We are not determined by our experiences, but are self-determined by the meaning we give to them… Meanings are not determined by situations. We determine ourselves by the meanings we ascribe to situations.” And Adler also said, “The hardest things for human beings to do are to know themselves and to change themselves.” An Adlerian coaching approach provides an opportunity to make visible to the client their own scaffold of meaning-making, and to choose intentional meaning-making for future self-creation.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review meaning as a core focus of Alfred Adler’s work
  2. Highlight an Adlerian core philosophical assumption that offers a deep underpinning of meaning for all coaching
  3. Identify key principles of Adlerian philosophy (a.k.a. Individual Psychology) that provide valuable points of reference to guide coaches in working effectively with clients
  4. Look at meaning-making as a source of subjective reality that impacts the client’s life and the work in coaching
  5. Connect the dots between these principles and ICF Coaching Core Competencies

Length: 20 mins

Symposium on Coaching and Personal Meaning | Meaning: The Golden Thread Woven throughout the Most Powerful Coaching

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

Panelists

  1. Laura Atwood, Ph.D.
  2. Gordon Medlock, Ph.D.
  3. Reese Haydon, Ph.D.
  4. Rachel Newton, RTC, MTC

Length: 1 hour

Laura Atwood’s Abstract

Meaning in coaching starts with the core question that underpins all of coaching: “What do you want?” And it’s important for us as coaches to go deeper and make sure that the client hears the real question of “What do you really, really want?” Not just what you think you should want, or what you’ve been told you should want, or what, maybe, you might try for. That deep-seated, personal want gives meaning, drive, energy, and focus to coaching, operating at all levels from the big, overarching goals for coaching, to the specific choices made in each conversation.

Meaning operates across the domains of coaching outcomes:

  • Identifying the “why bother?” or “what’s at stake?” that makes the hard work of enhancing performance worth the effort.
  • Recognizing that learning is always personal, and must be self-directed, based on the individual’s unique subjective perspective and process of meaning-making.
  • Enhancing personal fulfillment as the client discovers wonderful things about their unique strengths, values, and contributions they can make to the world, and starts to come off autopilot and take the wheel in steering their own life.

Meaning invites the client to pay attention to how they’re being in the world, to notice what brings out the best in them, and what triggers their lesser self to show up, and to choose more intentionally how to be, more of the time. Through focus on self as an expression of meaning, the client engages in a process of intentional evolution and creation of the future self.

Meaning guides the client in designing action steps that are right for them and supports them in holding themselves accountable to what’s truly important to them. Additionally, meaning connects the client to the big picture of their life, so that they can align all their goals, choices, and actions to their own design of purpose. Expression of meaning may change over time and place, but the constellation of internal elements of meaning, once discovered, can provide a valuable compass for a lifetime.

This rich parallel agenda, which can ride alongside a more concrete goals-focused agenda, offers the opportunity for meaning-focused transformation, and provides the great “Wow!” factor of coaching. And it fits comfortably within ICF’s Coaching Core Competencies and can be mapped to ICF’s PCC markers. Exploration of personal meaning is also a key element of coach formation, to enhance trust and presence, and to support client exploration at deeper levels.

Learning Objectives

  1. Highlight the many ways meaning underpins and/or expands coaching
  2. Review how meaning shows up in the coaching relationship across time and throughout each coaching conversation
  3. Map meaning to ICF Coaching Core Competencies and PCC Markers as core elements and/or available opportunities for more expansive work

Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc.

Programme Leader of MSc Coaching Psychology and Personal Coach

Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. is an existential coach (MA), positive psychologist (MSc), coach trainer and supervisor (Animas), Programme Leader of the MSc Coaching Psychology (UEL), mediator (Regent’s College), and personal consultant (PWBC) passionate about helping people grow by exploring the various facets of their existence in more depth. Yannick’s aim is to inspire those he meets and works with to live more courageously, think more deeply, and embrace the whole spectrum of what life and business have to offer. Yannick has worked with a wide range of clients as well as trained and supervised hundreds of coaches at a number of institutions. Born in Germany and based in London (UK), Yannick works internationally to deliver coaching as well as resilience training for those in “positions of great responsibility” (typically leaders and managers) as well as personal and social development programmes for schools and charities.

Pre-Conference Workshop | Happiness Meets Dread: An Introduction to Positive Existential Coaching as a Means to Living a Meaningful Existence

Thursday, August 2, 2018, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM (3.0 CEU)

What is the meaning of life? How can I live in ways that are meaningful to me? How can I make the best of my time on this planet? Answers to these questions tend to involve being happy, healthy, and making the most out of life. Yet these desires are often in conflict with the existential givens of human existence. A new understanding of happiness is needed in order to live “happily-ever-after” without the use of self-deception.

Positive Existential Coaching emerged from an appreciation of these three basic human needs (to be alive and happy with a sense of agency). At its core, it draws on the conceptualizations of happiness from the science of positive psychology, a philosophical exploration of the human condition, and the potential of coaching to enable clients to see themselves as they really are and empower them to live their lives in the best way possible.

This workshop offers a positive perspective on existential ideas and how these could be applied in the coaching room.

Learning Objectives

  1. Develop an awareness of the big questions in life and how they underlie what clients bring into the coaching space
  2. Introduce the basic tenets of positive existentialism
  3. Understand how positive psychology and existential philosophy can contribute to powerful coaching practice
  4. Provide coaches with practical ways of integrating elements of Positive Existential Coaching into their existing practice
  5. Witness and discuss a demonstration of Positive Existential Coaching

Length: 3 hours

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. (Existential Therapy)
  2. Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D. (Grief Therapy)
  3. Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. (Opioid Addiction)
  4. Julia Yang, Ph.D. (Existential Courage in Therapy)
  5. Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. (Positive Existential Coaching)
  6. Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. (Shame Experiences in Therapy)
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D. (Meaning Therapy)

Moderator

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

Abstract

A summary of the last summit on meaning therapy can be found in an article on five different perspectives of meaning in clinical practice. It is hoped that this year’s summit will lead to a landmark publication on what constitutes existential competency in clinical practice that is both trans-diagnostic and relevant to any therapeutic modality.

This summit will address broad existential issues such as: (1) What is an existential crisis? How can it be an opportunity for healing and personal growth? (2) Why is exploring one’s dark side needed to live life at a deeper spiritual level? (3) Are there different kinds of meaning-seeking with different implications for therapy? (4) What are some types of evidence-based meaning-focused coping? (5) What is ultimate meaning? How is it related to meaning-seeking and meaning-making? (6) How does the process of cultivating inner resources and intrinsic motivation increase one’s sense of meaning? (7) Is it necessary to teach clients to focus both on coping with the present reality and striving towards a future dream? (8) Is it helpful to teach clients to navigate between yin-yang and find the right balance between avoidance and approach? (9) Is the knowledge and skill of cultivating the spiritual values of sacredness and transcendental reality an essential part of existential competency? (10) How can we relate to our clients both as fellow human beings as well as competent and trustworthy mental health professionals?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the breadth and depth of existential competency
  2. Understand the importance of values and beliefs in meaning-seeking and meaning-making
  3. Learn how to relate to clients both as a professional and as a caring human being
  4. Learn how to integrate existential psychology and positive psychology in psychotherapy or coaching

Length: 2 hours

Click here for more…

Gordon E. Carkner, Ph.D.

Meta-Educator and Campus Chaplain at the University of British Columbia

Gordon E. Carkner, Ph.D. holds a Ph.D. in philosophy of culture (University of Wales, 2006). His dissertation is entitled “A Critical Examination of Michel Foucault’s Concept of Moral Self-Constitution in Dialogue with Charles Taylor.” Dr. Carkner works at the University of British Columbia as a meta-educator and campus chaplain, where he seeks to both complement and engage the regular discourse among graduate students and faculty. Gordon is a visionary, passionate about dialogue on salient questions of meaning and identity, faith and culture. Supporting and mentoring postgraduate students towards wholeheartedness and their full creative genius in the UBC Graduate Christian Union, his work is helping to shape young leaders for their future contribution. His project extends to his role as team leader in the interdisciplinary UBC Graduate and Faculty Christian Forum lecture series—a dialogue on faith and academic issues. GFCF brings together great minds from around the globe for serious academic engagement, linking persons of common vision while inspiring cutting-edge future research. Dr. Carkner holds a B.Sc. in Human Physiology (Queen’s University) and a Master of Divinity (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School). His recent publication, The Great Escape from Nihilism (2016), offers a critique of Western culture amidst the search for identity in late modernity. His research and writing interests lie in questions concerning freedom, identity and the good, secularity, worldviews, and philosophical anthropology.

Invited Talk | Late Modernity, the Challenge of Nihilism, and the Quest for Meaning

During paper session on “Meaning-Seeking” on Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:45 AM – 11:45 AM

We late moderns are on a challenging journey. It is deeply human to want meaning and purpose in life that transcends mere survival, but there are several obstacles within today’s Western culture, including various causes of ambivalence. In line with the critique of modernity by eminent Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor (Sources of the Self, 1989; A Secular Age, 2007), this talk will map a framework for understanding late modernity and some of its discontents. Ethics, identity and spirituality are interwoven, notes Taylor, one of the eminent twentieth century philosophers of the self. As he maps the late modern, Dr. Carkner will examine the problems of scientism, the over-emphasis on immanence, and the cultural ethos of moral subjectivism. He will demonstrate how such ideologies cause people to be confused about their personal convictions of life’s meaning. Some of the forces within late modernity are leading people away from higher forms of meaning and into a dysfunctional and confining nihilism. Our speaker proposes a way forward, a trajectory for the reconstitution of the self through a retrieval of the ancient language of the good, and through a transcendent philosophical turn towards agape love.

Learning Objectives

  1. Mapping late modernity with philosopher Charles Taylor
  2. Discerning the secular and the immanent frame—scientism as a barrier to meaning and full flourishing
  3. Impact of the Nova Effect of multiple contested meanings, multiple spiritual paths—existential ambivalence and the experience of being cross-pressured in the ethos of ethical subjectivism
  4. Suggestions for a positive reconstitution of self/identity in relation to the good—with special emphasis on the hypergood in Charles Taylor’s moral realism
  5. Re-enchantment of the immanent frame through a transcendent turn to agape love

Length: 20 mins

Summit on PP 2.0: Meaning in Life

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM (1.5 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Gordon Carkner, Ph.D.
  2. Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D.
  3. Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.
  4. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.
  5. Piers Worth, Ph.D.
  6. Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand.

Moderator

Seph Fontane Pennock

Abstract

For the present Summit, we seek to break new grounds in meaning research from the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0). We will address some of the ignored areas in meaning research, such as (1) How important is one’s worldview? Does it make any difference whether you believe that life has inherent meaning and is worth living despite suffering, or whether you believe that life is inherently meaningless and nihilistic? (2) What is a meaning crisis? Why is it so prevalent? (3) Can we live a meaningful life by being engaged in certain worthy activities according to science, without addressing the dark side of life and the reality of suffering? (4) Can we feel fully alive and meaningful from the painful striving towards a worthy ideal? (5) What are the cultural differences regarding what kind of life is meaningful? (6) Why is self-transcendence (ST) an important area for meaning research?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the importance of worldview in shaping one’s experience of MIL
  2. Understand the dark side of life and chaos as related to existential crisis
  3. Integrate science and religion in providing a fuller account of MIL
  4. Understand the importance of self-transcendence in meaning and purpose

Length: 1.5 hours

Click here for more…

Public Lecture on Decoding Peterson

Sunday, August 5, 2018, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Details TBC

Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor at the European University in Frankfurt and Senior Research Associate at Rhodes University

Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. is an Adjunct Professor in the Institute for Therapeutical Communication and Language Use at the European University in Frankfurt (Oder), Germany. She is further on a Senior Research Associate at Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa. She holds a Ph.D. in Psychology (University of Pretoria, South Africa), a Ph.D. in Management (Rhodes University, South Africa), a Doctorate in Cultural Anthropology (Georg-August University, Germany), and a Venia Legendi (European University Viadrina, Germany) in Psychology with focus on Work, Organizational, and Cultural Psychology. She has published several monographs, text collections, accredited journal articles, and special issues on transcultural mental health, sense of coherence and well-being, shame, transcultural conflict management and mediation, women in leadership, and psychobiography. For over fifteen years she has worked as a mediator, conducted intercultural training, and served as a systemic therapist in private practice.

Invited Talk | Transforming Shame Experiences through Therapeutic Interventions

During paper session on “Existential Positive Psychology and PP 2.0” on Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

Shame is a deep-rooted emotion which is experienced as negative and threatening across cultural contexts. Psychologists such as Freud, Breuer, and Jung worked with different interventions to manage and transform shame and to understand its meaning for the individual.

In this talk, it is argued that shame is often a hidden and ignored emotion in therapeutic settings and that it needs mindful and conscious interventions to transform it, contributing to meaningfulness, holistic well-being, and health in individuals. Based on case study descriptions of shame experiences and selected therapeutic interventions—such as dream analysis, active imagination, and healing rituals—the value of shame experiences and their transformation into a meaningful emotion for personal growth and development will be presented. Conclusions on how to constructively work with shame in therapeutic practice are presented and recommendations for future research and practice are given.

Learning Objectives

  1. See shame as a health resource
  2. Acknowledge the contribution of shame to meaningfulness, personal growth, and development
  3. Learn about selected interventions to transform shame
  4. Reflect on shame and future research, and practice to transform it

Length: 20 mins

Summit on Meaning-Centered Interventions

Friday, August 3, 2018, 10:45 AM – 12:45 PM (2.0 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Emmy van Deurzen, Ph.D. (Existential Therapy)
  2. Robert Neimeyer, Ph.D. (Grief Therapy)
  3. Bruce Alexander, Ph.D. (Opioid Addiction)
  4. Julia Yang, Ph.D. (Existential Courage in Therapy)
  5. Yannick Jacob, M.A., M.Sc. (Positive Existential Coaching)
  6. Claude-Hélène Mayer, Ph.D. (Shame Experiences in Therapy)
  7. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D. (Meaning Therapy)

Moderator

Joel Vos, Ph.D.

Abstract

A summary of the last summit on meaning therapy can be found in an article on five different perspectives of meaning in clinical practice. It is hoped that this year’s summit will lead to a landmark publication on what constitutes existential competency in clinical practice that is both trans-diagnostic and relevant to any therapeutic modality.

This summit will address broad existential issues such as: (1) What is an existential crisis? How can it be an opportunity for healing and personal growth? (2) Why is exploring one’s dark side needed to live life at a deeper spiritual level? (3) Are there different kinds of meaning-seeking with different implications for therapy? (4) What are some types of evidence-based meaning-focused coping? (5) What is ultimate meaning? How is it related to meaning-seeking and meaning-making? (6) How does the process of cultivating inner resources and intrinsic motivation increase one’s sense of meaning? (7) Is it necessary to teach clients to focus both on coping with the present reality and striving towards a future dream? (8) Is it helpful to teach clients to navigate between yin-yang and find the right balance between avoidance and approach? (9) Is the knowledge and skill of cultivating the spiritual values of sacredness and transcendental reality an essential part of existential competency? (10) How can we relate to our clients both as fellow human beings as well as competent and trustworthy mental health professionals?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the breadth and depth of existential competency
  2. Understand the importance of values and beliefs in meaning-seeking and meaning-making
  3. Learn how to relate to clients both as a professional and as a caring human being
  4. Learn how to integrate existential psychology and positive psychology in psychotherapy or coaching

Length: 2 hours

Click here for more…

Seph Fontane Pennock

Co-founder of Positive Psychology Program and Entrepreneur

Seph Fontane Pennock. As one of the co-founders of the Positive Psychology Program, Seph Fontane Pennock is helping practitioners all over the world to apply the scientific findings behind positive psychology in real-life settings. His current focus lies on developing a theoretical framework that clarifies the different kinds of meaning and what it is that we’re looking for when we question meaning.

Invited Talk | The Meaning of Meaning: What is it That We’re Really Looking For?

During paper session on “Meaning Making” on Sunday, August 5, 2018, 9:45 AM – 11:30 AM

Positive psychology provides us with a scientific approach to what makes life most worth living, but not with a philosophical motivation for actually living. Meaning lies at the core of that philosophical motivation, which is the reason for this talk. But there are big problems surrounding meaning. How can we assure we’re talking about the same thing without a theoretical framework or clarity on the definition of “meaning”?

Learning Objectives

  1. Why the word “meaning” is so problematic
  2. What are the different kinds of meaning?
  3. How does meaning come into existence?
  4. How do we ask better questions about the meaning of anything in life?

Length: 20 mins

Summit on PP 2.0: Meaning in Life | Moderator

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM (1.5 CEU)

Panelists

  1. Gordon Carkner, Ph.D.
  2. Dmitry Leontiev, Ph.D.
  3. Pninit Russo-Netzer, Ph.D.
  4. Paul T. P. Wong, Ph.D.
  5. Piers Worth, Ph.D.
  6. Yukun Zhao, Ph.D. Cand.

Moderator

Seph Fontane Pennock

Abstract

For the present Summit, we seek to break new grounds in meaning research from the perspective of second wave positive psychology (PP 2.0). We will address some of the ignored areas in meaning research, such as (1) How important is one’s worldview? Does it make any difference whether you believe that life has inherent meaning and is worth living despite suffering, or whether you believe that life is inherently meaningless and nihilistic? (2) What is a meaning crisis? Why is it so prevalent? (3) Can we live a meaningful life by being engaged in certain worthy activities according to science, without addressing the dark side of life and the reality of suffering? (4) Can we feel fully alive and meaningful from the painful striving towards a worthy ideal? (5) What are the cultural differences regarding what kind of life is meaningful? (6) Why is self-transcendence (ST) an important area for meaning research?

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the importance of worldview in shaping one’s experience of MIL
  2. Understand the dark side of life and chaos as related to existential crisis
  3. Integrate science and religion in providing a fuller account of MIL
  4. Understand the importance of self-transcendence in meaning and purpose

Length: 1.5 hours

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Kathy Story, M.A., J.D.

Owner of Story Consulting and Coaching and former co-director of the Leadership Institute in Judicial Education

Kathy Story, M.A., J.D., is an educator, facilitator, coach, and consultant with over 30 years experience in education, law, and counseling. She works with individuals, professional groups, and organizations to improve practice and satisfaction in their professions. She designs and delivers leadership institutes and faculty development workshops and has been an invited speaker at numerous national conferences. She regularly presents workshops on emotional intelligence, adult education, resilience, and immunity to change.

Kathy began her professional career in student affairs with positions in career counseling and academic advising. After returning to law school, she clerked for a federal appellate court judge, was in private practice as a commercial litigator, and served as legal advisor in student affairs at a major public university. She has taught graduate courses at three institutions, served in administrative capacities at four major universities, provided leadership development programs to health care administrators and corporate executives, and co-directed the Leadership Institute in Judicial Education, a federally-funded professional development program for judges and court administrators.

Kathy has a master’s degree in educational psychology/counseling from the University of Nebraska and a law degree from the University of Memphis. She is a trained facilitator for the University of Pennsylvania Resilience Program, a certified facilitator for the Immunity to Change Exercise developed at Harvard University, and a certified consultant for the EQ in Action Profile. She is also a career coach, and her attorney-coaching program was the first approved for CLE Credit in Tennessee/USA.

Workshop | Immunity to Change: When Core Meanings Impede Our Best Intentions

Saturday, August 4, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:45 PM (1.5 CEU)

This experiential workshop is based on the work of Robert Kegan and Lisa Lahy at Harvard University. We will use their Four Column Exercise to examine our attempts at personal and professional change, including our commitments to change, specific behaviors that get in the way of our commitments, our hidden competing commitments that hold those behaviors in place, and our Big Assumptions (core meanings) that prevent us from achieving the change we seek.  Participants will reveal their own immunity to change system, and develop an action plan for examining and surmounting their Big Assumption. Implications for the Four Column Exercise in therapy and coaching will be explored.

Learning Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Explain the Immunity to Change model of Kegan and Lahy
  • Apply the model to their own efforts of bringing about change in their own lives
  • Develop an action plan to examine their own Big Assumptions or core meanings that prevent them from achieving change
  • Describe the difference between Adaptive Change and Technical Change
  • Decide if the Four Column Exercise would be appropriate for their educational, therapy or coaching practices

Length: 2 hours

Solomon Makola, Ph.D.

Campus Director at the Central University of Technology, Free State (Welkom Campus) and psychologist

Solomon Makola, Ph.D., is an Associate Member of the Viktor Frankl Institute of Logotherapy. He has a Doctorate from the University of the Free State—the title of his thesis is: “Meaning in life and life stressors as predictors of first-year academic performance.” He is a Campus Director at the Central University of Technology, Free State (Welkom Campus), and a psychologist in private practice. Prof. Makola is registered with the HPCSA as a Counselling Psychologist, and he is also a member of Psychological Society of South Africa (PsySSA). He is a regular guest in one of the national radio stations, Lesedi FM, under SABC. Prof. Makola is a seasoned researcher; he has contributed research articles in accredited journals, and has also presented papers in national and international conferences. In 2014, he was awarded the PsySSA best practice award. The South African Association of Counselling Psychology also presented him with an award for being one of the most outstanding counselling psychologists. Prof. Makola is an author of two books published by UNISA Press in 2016 and 2017, respectively entitled Find Meaning, Stop Wondering and Pimp the Pain.

Invited Talk | Pimp the Pain: Purpose-Inspired Dialogues

During paper session on “Existential Positive Psychology and PP 2.0” on Friday, August 3, 2018, 3:15 PM – 4:30 PM

As a psycho-autobiography (professional memoir), this book serves a dual purpose. 

First, it is intended to give the reader some insights about the author; what kind of person he is today, how he got to be that way, and how Viktor Frankl’s philosophy of “sense of meaning and purpose” influenced his life.

Second, this book is meant to introduce the reader to the idiographic method of meaning research, i.e., the intensive psychological study of a particular individual. In this case, the author is both the researcher and the research participant. This was done by exploring three primary ways of finding meaning, 1) what we give to the world, 2) what we take from the world, and 3) the attitudes we attach towards unchangeable circumstance; as well as five areas where meaning can be discovered.

Based on these ways and areas, the author describes who he is, what he is like when around others, whether he thinks people perceive him the same way that he perceives himself, what he likes about himself, and what he would like to change. What makes this book innovative and original is that the narratives were supplemented with real dialogues on the social media (i.e., Facebook). In this way, the author has done an integral work because he allowed the general public to read the posts on Facebook and interrogate them in the form of a dialogue.

Work presented in this book earned the author the PsySSA Award for Best Practice, which was presented to him by the Psychological Society of South Africa in 2014/15. The book went through a double-blind peer review process mediated through the Senate Publications Committee of the University of South Africa.

Learning Objectives

  1. To teach people about the basic principles of logotherapy.
  2. To demonstrate how they can apply the principles of logotherapy in their daily activities.
  3. To teach people how to demonstrate to people how inspiration leads to innovation.

Length: 20 mins

Sponsors

Carrina Wong Chan

MANAGING DIRECTOR, SAINT HONORE

Sherrie Yee, M.A.

FOUNDER & CEO, JARDINE NATURALS

Contact us.

Fill out this simple form, or drop us a direct line at info@meaning.ca or +1 416 546 5588.

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